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CARLYLE CAMPBELL LIBRARY 



A 

376.8 



M5^I 
1919-1922 



ACCESSION 
50961 



MEREDITH COLLEGE 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



STUDENTS' HAND-BOOK 

OF 

vlEREDITH COLLEGE 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 
1919-1920 




MANAGERS: 
MADGE DANIELS RUTH GOLDSMITH 



Meredit h Co llege Library 
Raleigh, N. Ca 



RALEIGH 

Edwards &. Broughton PRiNxiNGiCo, 

1919 



WELCOME! 

To the old and new, 

To the lean and lank, 

To the short and round and fat. 

To the girls v:ho are good 

And the girls irho are bad. 

We reach our hand and a'that. 



w 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Welcome. 2 

Day's PEbgnam 4 

Social Calendar 5 

Student Government Department 7 

Ofl&ceres, House Presidents, etc 8 

Constitution 10 

By-laws 15 

College Regulations , . . . 17 

privileges 21 

Things You Ought to Know 24 

''Don'ts" 25 

Supplement to Hand-book 26 

"Point" System. . 29 

Greetings to Class of '23 30 

Y. W. C. A. Department 31 

Informal Opening Reception 32 

Motto 33 

Work of Y. W. C. A 34 

Cabinet PoHcy 39 

. "Hints to the Wise" 41 

Churches 42 

Other Organizations 43 

Literary Societies 44 

Athletic Association 45 

Student Publications 47 

Budget 48 

Alma Mater 48 



So^t 



A DAY'S PROGRAM 

A. M. 

Rising bell 6:45 

First breakfast bell (prayer meeting) 7 :30 

Breakfast 7 :45 

Chapel 8:35 

First class 9:00 

Second class 10 :00 

Third class 11 :00 

Fourth class 12:00 

p. M. 

Lunch 1 :00 

Fifth class 1 :30 

Sixth class 2:30 

First dinner bell 5:45 

Dinner 6:00 

Study hour 7 :45 

Visiting beU. 10:00 

Room bell 10:15 

Light beU 10:30 



SOCIAL CALENDAR 
Fall: 

For new girls especially — 

Y. W. C. A. reception. 

Mock track meet. 

Society reception and entertainments. 
Church receptions. 
Stmit night. 

Wake Forest Berean banquet. 
Y. W. C. A. Christmas party. 
State College receptions. 
Society Day. 

Syring: 
Founders' Day. 

Student Government Association reception. 
Wake Forest anniversary. 
Y. W. C. A. reception. 
Class entertainments. 
Field Day. 
Interclass games. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 
DEPARTMENT 



OFFICERS 

President Mary Ida Butler 

Vice-President Annie Hall Baity 

Secretary Madge Daniels 

Treasurer Louise Fleming 

HOUSE PRESIDENTS 

Main Building — Eugenia Thomas, President, 

Jeannette Biggs, Sub-President. 
Faircloth — Fannie Turlington, President, Buna 

Lawrence, Sub-President. 
East Building — Jessie Stilwell, President, Mar- 

JORIE Spence, Sub-President. 

COMMITTEES 

Social — Lydie Penton, Ann Eliza Brewer, 
LuciLE Kelley, Mary Creech Williams. 

Music — Moultrie Drake, Alethia Felton, Emma 
Louise Kehoe. 

Buildings and Grounds — Glenn Ward, Ruth Gold- 
smith, Louise Phillips, Lilla Earl Dowell. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT 

Student Government means all the Meredith 
girls, with a real Meredith sense of honor, working 
together to make Meredith the best college possible. 

There have been many changes made in our 
hand-book this year, but we feel sure that Meredith 
girls will rise to meet the new responsibihties that 
come with greater freedom, and will as college 
women set a high standard of honor. 

The spirit of the Student Association is the real 
college spirit, and a loyal student spirit means not 
only a cooperating student organization, but clean 
athletics, an enthusiastic Y. W. C. A., and a work- 
ing literary society. The success of any organiza- 
tion in college depends on the attitude of the girls 
toward the Student Government Association. We 
must work together for the common good of all 
before we can work in groups in smaller organiza- 
tions. 

Every individual girl is responsible for the carry- 
ing out of the laws of the Student Government. 
These laws are made by the students themselves, 
and approved by the faculty. Disregard of these 
laws means that a girl is not a loyal member of the 
college community and is not worthy of the privi- 
leges of the same. The Student Government 
encourages loyalty to all organizations, promptness 
in all duties, and a spirit of love and friendship 
among the girls. 



CONSTITUTION 

ARTICLE I. 

NAME. 

This Association shaU be called the Student 
Government Association of Meredith College. 

ARTICLE 11. 

object. 

The object of this Association shaU be the gov- 
ernment of the student body. 

ARTICLE III. 

MEMBERSHIP. 

(a) All students who are seventeen years of 
age shaD, upon registration at Meredith, become 
members of the Student Government Association. 

(b) All students who are not seventeen years 
of age shall, upon registration at Meredith, become 
associate members of the Student Government 
Association. 

ARTICLE IV. 

OPFiCiiJRS— THEIR ELECTION AND DUTIES. 

Section 1. The officers of the Association shall 
consist of a President, a Vice-President, a Secre- 
tary, and a Treasurer. 

Sec. 2. (a) The President . shall be chosen from 
the incoming Senior class. 
10 



(&) The officers and House Presidents shall 
36 elected by ballot at the annual meeting held 
the first Monday in March. 

(c) The officers shall enter upon their duties 
four weeks from date of election. 

Sec. 3. (a) It shall be the duty of the President 
to preside over all meetings of the Association and 
of the Executive Committee, to appoint any call 
meetings she may consider necessary, and to ap- 
point all committees not otherwise provided for 
in these articles. 

(5) The duties of the Vice-President shall be 
the same as those of the President, should the 
President at any time be unable to perform her 
duties. 

(c) It shall be the duty of the Secretary to record 
the proceedings of all meetings of the Association 
and of the Executive Committee, to post all official 
notices, to submit to the Dean the Hsts of mem- 
bers and associate members, officers, committees, 
and other bodies appointed by the Association. 

(d) It shall be the duty of the Treasurer to 
keep a strict and permanent account of all receipts 
and expenditures, to collect fines, to present a 
report at the annual meeting of the Association, 
and to perform other duties that may devolve 
upon her as Treasurer of the Association. 

ARTICLE V. 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

Section 1. The Executive Committee shall con- 
sist of the officers of the Association and the House 
Presidents. 

li 



Sec. 2. (a) It shall be the duty of the Exec- 
utive Committee to meet every six weeks, to en- 
force the rules of the Association, and to consider 
business of that body. 

(6) It shall be the duty of the Executive Com- 
mittee to divide the corridors into districts, and to 
determine the tenure of office of the proctors. 

(c) The Executive Committee may, at its dis- 
cretion, summon before it and reprimand any 
member or members of the Association. The 
committee shall have the right to withdraw privi- 
leges and to impose penalties. These, however, 
shall be reported to the Advisory Committee 
before being put into effect. The penalties of 
public reprimand, demerits, suspension and ex- 
pulsion shall be subject to the approval of the 
faculty or a committee representing the faculty. 

(d) It shall be the duty of the Executive Com- 
mittee to consider proposed regulations and to 
refer such as are approved to the Academic Coun- 
cil for their approval or disapproval. The Academic 
Council agrees to pass no regulations except such 
as have been passed by the Executive Committee. 

Sec. 3. (a) The Advisory Committee shall con- 
sist of the Dean and two members of the faculty. 

(6) The duties of the Advisory Committee shall 
be to receive reports from the Executive Com- 
mittee and to confer with that committee whenever 
occasion may demand. 

Sec. 4. The Nominating Committee shall be 

composed of the presidents of the various college 

organizations; that is, of the Student Government 

Association, of the Y. W. C. A., and of the two 

12 



Societies. The president of the Student Govern- 
ment Association shall act as chairman. 

ARTICLE VI. 

MEETINGS 

Section 1. (a) A meeting shaU be held as soon 
as possible after the beginning of the coUege year, 
at which time the Constitution, By-Laws, and 
Regulations shall be read and explained. 

(h) A meeting shall be held the first Monday 
in March for the election of officers. 

(c) A meeting of the Association shaU be called 
once each month for reports from the Executive 
Committee and discussion by the members. 

Sec. 2. Meetings of the Association may be 
called at any time by the President on her own 
motion, and must be caUed by her on the written 
request of ten members. The object of these 
special meetings shall be stated in writing when 
the request is made. 

ARTICLE VII. 

JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT. 

Section 1. The judicial power of the Associa- 
tion shall be vested in — 

(a) The Association, which shall constitute a 
higher court, and which shaU be a Court of Appeal 
from the decisions of the Executive Committee. 

(6) The Executive Committee, which shall 
constitute the lower court, and from which alone 
an appeal to the whole Association may be made. 
13 



ARTICLE VIII. 

QUORUM. 

Section 1. (a) One-third of the members of 
the Association shall constitute a quorum for the 
transaction of ordinary business. 

(b) Two-thirds of the members of the Asso- 
ciation shall constitute a quorum for the annual 
meeting in March, for any meeting in which an 
amendment or change in the Constitution is voted 
on, and when the Association is acting in its judicial 
capacity. 

ARTICLE IX. 

AMENDMENTS. 

Section 1. An amendment may be proposed by 
the faculty, by the Student Executive Committee, 
or by any fifteen members of the Association. The 
proposed amendment shall be posted at least one 
week before it is presented to the Association, and 
shaU be approved by the faculty of the college 
before its adoption. 



U 



BY-LAWS 

I. 

The rules contained in Roberts' Rules of Order 
shall govern the Association in all business meet- 
ings. 

II. 

(a) The annual dues of the Association shall 
be seventy-five cents. 

(h) A fine of ten cents shall be imposed upon 
any member of the Association who is absent 
from a meeting without an excuse acceptable to 
the Executive Committee. 

III. 

(a) Nominations for officers shall be posted at 
least three days before election. 

(&) A pluraHty of votes cast shall elect aU ofiicers 
of the Association. 

IV. 

(a) Each coUege dormitory shall be divided 
into districts, each of which shall have a proctor. 
There shall be a House President for each house 
and a sub-House President. 

(b) The House President, together with the 
proctors of the house, shall form a House Coun- 
cil, whose duties shall be to enforce all rules of 
the Association pertaining to the government of 
the house. 

(c) Each House President shaU require every 
student in her house within two weeks after the 

15 



opening of the fall semester to sign the following 
statement: "I have read the Constitution, By- 
Laws, and Regulations of the Student Govern- 
ment Association. I realize that I am on my 
honor to keep the rules of the Association, and I 
pledge myself to observe the same and to try to 
be a consistent member." When any associate 
member shall have attained the age of seventeen 
years, she shall become a regular member of the 
Association, upon notifying her House President. 

(d) There shall be regular meetings of the House 
Council every six weeks. 

(e) Proctors wiU not give permissions. 

(f) The sub-House President shall act in the 
absence of the House President and assist her as 
occasion demands. 



16 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 

1. The rising bell will ring at 6:45 a. m.; the 
etiring bell at 10:30 p. m. At the ringing of 
he retiring bell aU lights will be extinguished, 
tudents will retire and the house be quiet until 
he rising bell. No extra time will be allowed 
ifter 10:30. 

2. The dining room doors shall be closed five 
ninutes after the last beU rings. 

3. Students may not be off the campus when 
lue for any college duty: when visiting, however, 
tudents may leave the college Saturday when 
vork is finished and must be at the coUege for 
vork Tuesday morning. 

4. Students will not leave the college grounds 
vithout registering except for walking or work- 
ng at the State or Raney Library. 

5. Students will register in the Dean's office 
vhen exercising any special privilege off the cam- 
Jdus, such as attending receptions, ball games, etc. 

I 6. No visits wiU be made without a written 
iDermission from parent or guardian stating to 
vhom the visit is to be made. This must be 
nailed directly to the President or the Dean; 
)therwise, it wiU not be considered. 

7. Students may not be accompanied to or 
rom the station or receptions by young men. 

8. No one may visit in town over night during 
j'air holidays, except with members of the im- 
nediate family. 

17 



9. During the State Fair, Wednesday and 
Thursday are given as hoHdays. All students 
who attend the Fair, except Seniors and Juniors 
are chaperoned either by some friend approved 
by the Dean, or by members of the faculty. 

10. Students will not visit restaurants, hotels 
railroad stations, or places of amusement with 
out permission and a chaperon. 

11. No student idll entertain guests in her room 
All visitors will be entertained in the parlors. Nc 
young lady will go to the parlors to meet friends 
without permission from the Dean. 

12. Because of the lack of guest chambers 
students may not entertain their friends over 
night ajt the coUege. 

13. Students may not attend social affairs oi 
those merely for entertainment on school days 
Requests to attend those of educational vaiu< 
will be referred to the Dean. 

14. Students may not sit with young men ii 
chapel at any function under the auspices of th( 
college, but may do so when it is under the auspice 
of a student organization. 

15. Students may not ride on street cars excep 
when going to or from the station and when calling 
with the permission of the Dean. 

16. All students are required to attend Sunday 
School and church 85 per cent of the time oi 
Sunday mornings. When taking cuts, they ma; 
attend church services elsewhere than at thei 
own church, but must not answer to roU-cal] 
Any student who is in the Infirmary more thai 
15 per cent of the time will be excused for thos 
extra times. 

18 



17. Students should be in their places in chapel 
?7hen the three-minute bell stops ringing. Talking 
s forbidden after the organist begins playing, 
^^o books will be taken into chapel. 

18. Each unexcused absence or tardiness from 
my college duty, such as registering for shop- 
Ding or for any special privilege, answering Sunday 
School roll-call, etc., will count as one delinquent, 

^cept absence from chapel which will count as two. 
Any student receiving nine dehnquencies during 
my quarter will be debarred from exercising the 
privileges of the Student Govem'ment Association. 
Students receiving nine during the last quarter 
;vill lose their privileges for the two weeks before 
3om mencement . 

19. Students will report, within three days, to 
:he Dean to be excused from any absence or tardi- 
less; otherwise, these will go on the college record 
as unexcused dehnquencies. 

20. "Call downs" will be given for going over 
an official study sign. Three of these makes a 
?irl subject to a reprimand from the Student 
Committee. 

21. Quiet will be preserved during the follow- 
ing hours: 

(a) On Sunday during Silent Hour, that is, 
from 2 p. m. to 4:30 p. m. 

(b) On Monday from 7:45 p. m. to 10:00 p. m.; 
on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday 
from 8:35 a. m. to 1:00 p. m., and from 1:30 p. m. 
to 2:30 p. m., and from 7:45 p. m. to 10:00 p. m.; 
on Saturday from 8:35 a. m. to 1:00 p. m., and 
from 1:30 p. m. to 2:30 p. m. 

19 



22. Under no circumstances will visiting durin^j 
the Sunday Silent Hour be allowed, unless per 
mission has been obtained from the House Presi 
dent hefore 2 o'clock. 

23. Permission to send telegrams or long-distanc( 
messages may be obtained from the Dean during 
her ofl5ce hours. Such messages must be paid fo] 
in advance. 

24. No student may send any matter to the 
local press for publication without the permissioi 
of the Dean; and all posters, invitations, or othe; 
printed matter must be approved by the Dean. 

25. Chafing-dishes with alcohol burners maj 
not be used in the coUege, A charge of five centi 
an hour will be made for the use of electric plates. 

26. Dancing and card-playing will not be per 
mitted. In regard to these, there is a difference 
of opinion, but all will agree that it is safe to replace 
them by other recreations. 

27. Sororities of whatever name or kind, whethe: 
regular or irregular, affiliating with similar organiza 
tions elsewhere or unaffiliating, are absolutely prohib 
ited. The punishment for this offense will be expulsion 
demerits, or suspension, or a combination of any o, 
these at the discretion of the Academic Council am 
Student Executive Committee. 

28. Students will not carry on a conversatioi 
with young men on the campus, at the libraries 
at the drug stores, or on the street. 

29. Any student found communicating by wore 
or sign, beyond simple recognition, from any par 
of the building or grounds, or elsewhere, or makinj 
clandestine engagements with any man, will bi 

20 



eprimanded, demented, suspended, or expelled, 
it the discretion of the Student Executive Com- 
nittee and the Faculty. 

30. Hazing is absolutely forbidden. Any un- 
velcome interference by one class with another 
■lass, or by the members of one class with the 
nembers of another, is included in the term "haz- 
ng." 

31. The punishment for cheating on examina- 
ion, or elsewhere, will be expulsion, -withdrawal 
►f credits, or demerits, or a combination of the 
ast two, at the discretion of the Academic Council 
nd Student Executive Co mmi ttee. 

PRIVILEGES 

[In order to exercise the privileges of the Stu- 
[ent Government Association each student's parent 
■r guardian must have notified the Dean of his 
)ermission for his daughter to exercise these privi- 
eges. This permission must be mailed directly to 
he President or Dean of the CoUege.] 

Those having the necessary permissions may 
Lave the following privileges: 

1. After the first semester Freshmen may shop 
>n any one afternoon in week in groups of two, 
)Ut during the first semester they must do their 
hopping on Monday. 

2. May receive visits from friends on Monday 
ftemoons from 3:30 to 5:30 or on Saturday even- 
ags after Society, provided they go to Society. 

3. IMay dine with friends in town any two Sat- 
urday evenings during a semester; may dine dovm. 
own with young men vdDi a chaperon approved 
y the Dean one evening during a semester. 

21 



4. May make calls in town any one afternoon in 
week, provided the Dean is notified before such 
calls are made. 

5. May make week-end visits in the homes of 
friends four times a year and in the homes of near 
relatives once a month. ("Near relatives" will 
be interpreted to mean grandparents, brothers, 
or sisters.) 

When making week-end visits in the city, stu- 
dents may leave the college at 4:30 p. m., on Sat- 
urday, provided theij- academic work is finished 
and must be on the campus Monday at 5:30 p. m. 
during the winter, and 6 p. m. duri^ng the early 
fall and late spring. Those spending the day in 
the city must observe the same hours for their 
return to the college. 

6. When visiting in the city, students may 
appear on the streets or in public gatherings with 
young men if chaperons have been approved by 
the Dean. 

7. May take part in studio parties two times a 
semester. 

8. During the first six weeks in the fall FreshmeD 
must be accompanied by old girls when walking. 

9. With the permission of the House Presi 
dent, girls may spend the night with friends in 
the same or other buildings. 

10. With the permission of the Dean students 
may go driving on Monday and Saturdaj'' after- 
noons; with young men on Monday and seconc 
Saturday afternoons, provided a chaperon approved 
by the Dean has been secured. 

11. Students may walk from 4:30 to 5:30 Sundaj 
afternoon in the northern and eastern part of town 

22 



12. Students may attend moving picture shows 
one Monday a month with faculty or approved 
student chaperon. No chaperon should have more 
than six girls in her party. 

13. Students may spend Sundays in town and 
let them count as week-ends. 

SOPHOMORE PRIVILEGES 

Besides the above privileges the Sophomores 
have the following : 

1. The class may have one evening off during 
the session, provided no member of the class is 
guilty of hazing in any manner whatever. 

2. Members of class may go to church with a 
chaperon three Sunday nights during a semester. 

JUNIOR PRIVILEGES 

The Juniors have the foUomng special privileges: 

1. Approved Juniors may chaperon anywhere 
that student chaperonage is permissable. 

2. Members of the class may go to dentist and, 
occulist in groups of two. 

3. May attend church Sunday night with a 
chaperon. 

4. May receive caUers any one afternoon or any- 
one evening except Sunday. 

5. May shop any two afternoons after school.. 

SENIOR PRIVILEGES 

The Seniors have the following special privileges: 

1. May walk and shop alone. 

2. May receive callers any two afternoons or any 
two evenings in week except Sunday, or with the 

23 



permission of the Dean may spend the afternoon 
or evening away from the college. In addition 
Seniors may have callers Monday afternoon. 

3. May be excused from answering to Sunday 
School roU-call. 

4. May go to ball games, matinees, and pictures 
in groups of three without a chaperon when it is 
permissible to be away from the college. 

5. May occasionally spend a Sunday in town. 

6. May have one extra week-end during the 
last six weeks. 

7. May go to church Sunday evenings in groups 
of three. 

THINGS YOU OUGHT TO KNOW 

1. Students are under the college regulations 
from the time they reach the college until they 
take the train to leave Raleigh, or until they 
have received permission from the Dean to visit 
in the city at Christmas vacation or at the close 
of the session. 

2. Students may not walk in the business sections 
T)f the city, on Fayetteville and Hillsboro streets, 
in the Capitol Square, in or near the vicinity of the 
railroad shops, or station unless they have regis- 
tered to go shopping. 

3. No medicines are to be administered except 
by the advice and prescription of the physician, as 
much harm results from the promiscuous taking 
of medicine without competent advice. 

4. Students will be held responsible and will 
pay for loss, breakage, and damage in which they 
are instrumental. All such injuries should be 

24 



promptly reported to the Housekeeper. No fur- 
niture may be moved from any place without her 
permission. 

5. Sunday School roll will not be taken on Easter 
Sunday. 

6. Pianos may not be used on Sunday mornings. 

7. No student may, without permission from 
the Dean, have colored women come to her room 
or to the dormitory corridors, as there is danger 
of loss of money or clothes. 

8. White middy blouses and dark skirts, or any 
kind of washable middy suits may not be worn to 
Sunday dinner, on the streets at any time, or else- 
where after 4:30 p. m., except on the dormitory 
halls. Regulation serge middy suits may be worn 
except on Fayetteville Street, in the parlors, and 
on Sunday after 1:00 p. m., or on occasions when 
they would be inappropriate. 

DONT'S 

1. Don't get discouraged the first few weeks of 
your college year. 

2. Dgn't forget that you are a Meredith girl 
because people judge Meredith by you. 

3. Don't forget and disturb your neighbor by 
calling from one building to the other. 

4. Don't forget that your room is near the 
street, and be careful to draw your shades when you 
light your room at night. 

5. Don't give outsiders a bad impression of 
Meredith by sitting in the windows. 



2'5 



SUPPLEMENT 

TO THE 

HAND-BOOK 



Academic Regulations not Printed 
IN THE Catalogue 

1. Students may be excused for absence from 
class for illness in the infirmary or on a doctor's 
written statement. They may also be excused 
by the Dean for reasons deemed by her sufficient. 
In addition, students may be absent without excuse 
for not more than one day a semester. However, 
they may not be away from the college without 
excuse and so miss classes except for visits home. 

2. Unexcused absence will entail lowering of 
grade. The semester grade will be lowered in 
the Dean's office for each unexcused absence in 
a one-hour subject five points; in a two-hour sub- 
ject three points; in a three-hour subject two and a 
half points; in a four-hour subject two points. 

Students will arrange with their instructors 
about making up work missed. 

4. Students will receive zeros for cutting the 
last recitation in subjects before a holiday, and 
the first after a holiday. 

5. Students may not miss class work or private 
lessons, or change them from one day to another, 
to make visits. See privilege 5 of the Hand-book. 

6. A student may not drop a subject or change 
her course without permission from the Dean. 

26 



7. Students are required to take examinations 
in all subjects pursued during a semester. 

8. No one will be excused from any college 
duty on account of illness imless she is the patient 
of the physician or nurse. 

9. Students may not take part in plays or other 
entertainments without the permission of the 
Dean. Ordinarily, permission will not be given 
to those who are not making grade or who have 
more than sixteen hours of work per week. 

REGULATIONS FOR TUTORING. 

1. Students may tutor only with tutors who 
have been approved by the Dean and the head 
of the department. 

2. The nimiber of hours which a tutor may 
have wiU be determined by the Dean. (Ordi- 
narily, three hours of tutoring will count as one 
academic hour.) 

3. Absences from tutoring lessons and unpre- 
pared will be reported and counted as if from 
regular class. 

4. The price for tutoring lessons wiU be, under 
ordinary circumstances, twenty-five cents an hour 
for individual work. If there are more than one 
in a course, the Dean and the tutor wiU determine 
the price. 

MUSIC PRACTICE 

1. Under all circumstances proctors will mark 
a student absent if she does not practice during 
the time assigned her. 

27 



2. Under no circumstances do proctors excuse 
students; therefore, do not make such requests 
of them. Make these requests to the Dean. 

3. Under all ordinary conditions students will 
practice at their regular time. If any one wishes 
to substitute some other hour, the permission of 
the Dean must be obtained before the change is 
made; othencise, the absence v:ill not be excused. 

4. When students are given the privilege of 
making up practice, it must be made up and so 
reported within three days from the time it was 
missed. Otherwise, it will go on the college record 
as unexcused. 

5. All students taking as much as two hours 
of practice are required to attend the student 
recitals on Thursday afternoons; any other music 
student not having the equivalent of fifteen hours 
of work a week will be required to attend. An 
unexcused absence from recital will count as an 
absence from regular practice. 

6. Every absence or tardiness should be re- 
ported to the Dean at once. Unless so reported, 
after three days such delinquency will go on the 
college record as unexcused. 

7. Three unexcused absences from practice 
during any quarter causes loss of privileges for 
a month for those practicing from one to two 
hours a day. 

Four unexcused absences from practice during 
any quarter causes loss of privileges for a month 
for those practicing three or more hours a day. 

In all cases two tardies count as one absence; 
leaving practice rooms without permission for 
visiting or other purposes will count as a tardy. 
28 



THE ** POINT'' SYSTEM 

In order not to give any student more non- 
academic work than she can do well the Academic 
Council. has rated in "points" each non-academic 
office, and ruled that no student may have more 
than twenty-one points, without special permission 
of the Council. They were assisted in the rating 
by the presidents of the four largest organizations. 
The rating is as follows : 



Student Government- 
President, 15 
Vice-President, 9 
Secretary, 9 
Treasurer, 9 
House President, 12 
Sub-House President, 9 

Y. W. C. A.— 

President, 15 
Vice-President, 12 
Secretary, 12 
Treasurer, 12 
Storekeeper, 12 
President Y. W. A., 12 
Secy.-Treas. Y. W. A., 9 

Chairmen of Committees — 
Religious Work, 12 
Publicity, 12 
Community Service, 9 
Social, 9 
Membership, 12 
Finance, 12 
Annual Member, 9 

Societies — 
President, 15 
Vice-President, 3 
Secretary, 3 
Treasurer, 9 

Corresponding Secretary, 3 
Usher, 6 



Chairmen of Committees — 
Program, 9 
Refreshment, 3 
Room, 3 

Acorn- 
Editor-in-Chief, 15 
Business Manager, 12 
Asst. Editor-in-Chief, 12 
Asst. Business Manager, 12 
Junior Editors, 9 
Sophomore Editors, 9 

Oak Leaves — 
Editor-in-Chief, 15 
Business Manager, 15 
Asst. Editor-in-Chief, 12 
Asst. Business Manager, 12 
Junior Editors, 3 
Sophomore Edito:fs, 3 

Senior Class — 

President, 15 

Vice-President, 3 

Secretary , 3 

Treasurer, 9 
Other Classes- 
President, 9 

Vice-President, 6 

Secretary, 3 

Treasurer, 6 
Athletic Association — 

President, 9 

Treasurer, 3 



29 



WELCOME AND GREETINGS TO 

CLASS OF '23 
Sister Freshmen: 

We have been thinking of you all lots and are 
waiting and planning for you even before you get 
here. Of course, the "dignified" Seniors will 
welcome you and the "mischievous" Sophs will 
be plotting and planning to take you by surprise, 
but remember that we, the "jolly" Juniors, want 
you to be our "little sisters" and that we are eagerly 
waiting to do all we can to show you what "citizen- 
ship" in our college community means. We want 
to be proud of you and love you like "sure 'nuf" 
sisters. 

Loyally, 

Your "big sisters," 
Juniors. 



30 



YOUNG WOMEN'S 
CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



You ARE Cordially Invited to Atteistd 

THE 

INFORMAL Opening 
Reception 

Given to New Students 

BY THE 

YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION 

AT 

EIGHT O'CLOCK, P. M. 
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER THIRTEENTH 



MOTTO 

^^Not by might nor by power, but by 
My Spirit, saith the Lord of Hosts." 

GREETING 

Through these pages we extend a 
most hearty welcome in the name of 
the One for whose glory our Associa- 
tion is founded, to all students enter- 
ing Meredith this fall. It is the ear- 
nest prayer of the committee that the 
associational work not only may be a 
blessing to you, but also that you may 
be a blessing to the Association. 



33 



I 



WORK OF YOUNG WOMEN'S 
CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

OFFICERS 

Margueeite Maddrey Presiden 

Margaret Stroud Vice-Presiden 

Vernie Eddins Secretan 

Blanche Burke Treasure, 

DEPARTMENTS AND COMMITTEES 

I. Membership — Margaret Stroud. 

(a) Fall Campaign Committee. 
(6) New Girls Committee. 

II. Finance — Blanche Burke. 

(a) Dues. 
(6) Pledges. 

III. Publicity — Mary Lee Caldwell. 

(a) Bulletin Board — Mary Lee Caldwell. 
(6) Library and Publication — Ann Eliz^ 
Brewer. 

(c) Poster — Mary Tillery. 

(d) Editor — Ruth Goldsmith. 

IV. Religious Work — Lidie Penton. 
(a) Meetings. 

1. Sunday night — Lidie Penton. 

2. Music — Eugenia Thomas. 

3. Prayer meeting— Mattie Macon Norman 
(6) Bible Study — Madge Daniels. 

1. Group. 

2. Individual. 

34 



II. Social — Katharine Shipman. 

(a) Hospitality — Moultrie Drake. 

(6) Social Standards — Katharine Shipman. 

(c) Blue Ridge — Annabel Bridger, 

VI. Community Service — Jeannette Biggs. 
(a) On Campus — Emma Jackson. 

(6) Off Campus — Fannie Turlington. 

VII. Young Women's Auxiliary. 
Lily May Aycock — President. 
Inez Wooten — Vice-President. 
Irene Money — Secretary-Treasurer. 

VIII. " V-room — Louise Fleming. 

ADVISORY BOARD 

Miss Catherine Allen 
Miss Flossie Marshbanks 
Miss Marguerite Higgs 

WORK OF THE DIFFERENT DEPARTMENTS 
MEMBERSHIP DEPARTMENT 

Margaret Stroud — Chairman 
The object of the membership committee is to 
welcome each and every girl who comes to Meredith, 
and to recruit members for the Y. W. C. A. These 
girls have charge of the Information Bureau at the 
beginning of the fall term and are glad to do every 
thing possible for the new girls. 

FINANCE DEPARTMENT 

Blanche Burke — Chairman 

This department has charge of all the financial 

problems of the Y. W. C. A. It plans the budget 

for the incoming year, and collects all dues and 

35 



voluntary pledges. At the end of the year it gives 
an accurate statement of all the expenditures in 
all the departments of the Y. W. C. A. 

The budget, which worked out very successfully, 
was as follows: 

INCOME 

Dues $ 255.00 

Pledges 2,961.00 

''Y" Store 223.94 

Total $3,439.94 

EXPENDITURES 

United War Work Campaign. . .$2, 586.00 

Department expenses 66.21 

Annual 25.00 

Printing 39.61 

South Atlantic Field 100 . 80 

Literature 30. 60 

Conventions and Conferences . . 141 . 00 

African School 350.00 

Home Missions 25 . 00 

Total $3,364.22 

PUBLICITY DEPARTMENT 
Mary Lee Caldwell — Chairman 

The function of the Publicity Department is to 
inform the girls of present day problems of every 
nature, and to keep them vitally in touch with 
all the Y. W. C. A. work of our Association and 
others. In accomphshing this work, the poster 
36 



committee helps to make the walls speak by their 
several attractive posters each week. 

Magazines and good books are placed in our 
''Y" Ubrary, where each girl may pass a pleasant 
hour in light reading or study. 

Our Editor keeps this Association linked up with 
others by contributions of unique plans to the 
Association Monthly and to the monthly magazine 
of our own college. 

In this way the Publicity Department serves as 
a wireless station to bring through literature and 
posters the news of all lands to the students. 

RELIGIOUS WORK DEPARTMENT 

LiDiE Penton — Chairman 

The work of the Program Committee is to 
arrange the programs for the Sunday night meet- 
ings. This includes the selections of speakers from 
the faculty, student body or outside speakers. 
A missionary program is given the first Sunday 
night of each month. The other programs are 
on topics of interest and are usually arranged so 
as to center around one main theme. . 

The work of the Music Committee is to select 
a choir for the meetings and train them in singing 
new selections, it also arranges for the special 
i programs and soloists. 

The work of the Bible Study Committee is to 
arrange the schedule of the classes, to select leaders 
and books for each class. 

The Morning Watch Committee appoints the 
leaders for the services each day; these are usually 
chosen from the student body. 
37 



SOCIAL DEPARTMENT 

Katharine Shipman, Chairman 

The work of this department is to arrange for all 
the social functions of the Association; to plan 
parties for the new girls in the fall which are given 
in our "Y" room. They also, through the co- 
operation of every girl in school, try to create 
standards of the very highest type. 

The Blue Ridge Committee does great work in 
arranging good programs to inerest the girls in 
Blue Ridge, and also has charge of all the teas 
that are given for this cause. 

COMMUNITY SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

Jeannette Biggs — Chairman 

The Social Service Department gives the stu- 
dent an opportunity for some definite service for 
the Master. Through serving others the mind is 
broadened and a sympathy for humanity is 
awakened by means of committee work both on 
and off the college campus. 

YOUNG WOMEN'S AUXILIARY 

Lily May Aycock — President 

It is the aim of the Young Women's AuxiHary 
to bring the girls into a very sympathetic, intellec- 
tual relationship with missions. On the first Sun- 
day night in each month it gives a missionary pro- 
gram. In connection with this work, it helps with 
the mission study classes that are conducted by 
either faculty members or some student. 
38 



THE CABINET POLICY 

Ai7n of the Association: 

(a) To unite the women of the institution in 
loyalty to Jesus Christ. 

(b) To lead them to accept Him as their per- 
sonal Savior. 

(c) To build them up in the knowledge of Christ, 
especially through Bible study and Christian ser- 
vice, that their character and conduct may be con- 
sonant with their belief. It shall thus associate 
them with the students of the world for the advance- 
ment of the Kingdom of God. 

(d) To seek to enlist their devotion to the Christ- 
ian Church and to the religious work of the insti- 
tution. 

Aim of the Cabinet: 

To carry out the purpose of the Association by 
endeavoring : 

1. To bring every girl into Association work. 

2. To raise the standard of the social life of the 
school by frequent simple gatherings and by seek- 
ing to break down every barrier between the girls — 
thus holding up the social teachings of Jesus Christ. 

3. To spend part of each day in real prayer and 
faithful Bible study. 

4. To bring each girl into a close fellowship with 
Jesus Christ by means of Bible classes. 

5. To meet every Sunday afternoon for counsel 
and definite prayer and every Thursday night at 
9:00 for prayer and discussion of work. 

6. To deepen the spiritual Hfe of each girl, indi- 
vidually, by prayerful, personal work, by daily 
morning prayer meetings, and by weekly devotional 
meetings on Sunday night in the chapel. 

39 



7. To arouse interest in missions by 

(a) Giving systematically to missions; 
(6) Mission-study classes; 
(c) A strong missionary meeting the first 
Sunday night in each month. 

8. To keep ourselves informed in regard to gen- 
eral Association work. 

9. To give written monthly reports to the Sec- 
retary, and to keep careful records of all work for 
the help of the new cabinet. 

10. To heartily cooperate individually and as a 
cabinet with the Student Council in securing and 
maintaining a high standard of young womanhood 
in our school. 

11. To consider ourselves a personal workers' 
band, endeavoring, with God's help, to bring to 
Christ every girl who has not already confessed 
Him, and to pray with this definite purpose. 

WHY YOU SHOULD JOIN 

THE YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN 

ASSOCIATION 

To you who are entering college this fall for the 
first time, let us say a few words about why you 
should join the Y. W. C. A. 

In the first place you should begin your college 
life by identifying yourself with the Christian work 
of the school, for in this way you are brought under 
the best influences of the college course. 

A girl's character is formed before her college 

course is ended. In the molding of your character, 

do you wish to leave out Christ? Be sure, then, 

that you join the Y. W. C. A. at the beginning of 

40 



^our course, and thereby seize the opportunity for 
;he development of your spiritual life. 

You need spiritual inspiration as well as intellec- 
,ual inspiration. 

You are given a wonderful opportunity for ser\dng 
I^hrist by winning for Him the lives of those who 
lave never known Him. 

In joining the Y. W. C. A. you are becoming a 
part of a world-wide student movement, which has 
for its members the strongest and most earnest stu- 
dents all over the world. 

"HINTS TO THE WISE" 

Come early and avoid the rush. 

Look out for Meredith Y. W. C. A. badges at the 
station. 

Listen for the call of the night watchman, if you 
come on a night train. 

Register as soon as possible after you arrive. 

After you register, go to the adjoining room, 
over the door of which Information Bureau wiU be 
printed in large letters, for any information. 

Those wearing the Y. W. C. A. badges wiU gladly 
give you any assistance they can during the days of 
classification. 

Writing materials may be purchased at the 
Y. W^ C. A. stores on the second floor of Faircloth 
Hall and on the third floor of Main Building. 

Ask the old girls anything, any time. They are 
always anxious to help you. 

Bring pillowcases, sheets, dresser and table 

covers with you. Your material for curtains had 

best be bought here, so you wiU have no trouble in 

fitting your ^dndows. But this is not all. Every 

41 



college girl wants an attractive room. So bring 
your pennants, sofa cushions, pictures, mottoes, 
and all those little fixings which add so much to a 
room. Remember that you will be here for nine 
months, and you certainly will enjoy life more in a 
cheerful room. 

Somebody is more homesick than you are. Try 
to forget that you are lonely and do something 
for that other girl. 

The three bulletin boards — the official bulletin 
board, near the library door, the Student Govern- 
ment bulletin board, just opposite, and the Y. W. 
C. A. bulletin board, at the entrance to Faircloth 
Hall, are very important. Watch them. 

Remember to patronize the firms that advertise 
in our publications. "Turn about is fair play." 

The library is for quiet study. If you talk, it 
misses its purpose. 

At twilight when you feel the "blues" coming 
on, make a rush for the Y. W. C. A. room — No. 2, 
first floor. East Building. The "blues" can't 
exist there at any time — day or night. 

CHURCHES 

There are Baptist, Methodist, Presbyterian, 
Episcopal, Catholic, Christian, Lutheran Churches 
in Raleigh. Every student is allowed to attend 
the church for which she has a choice. The first 
two Sundays after school opens the students are 
allowed to visit different churches of their de- 
nomination. After that they must fully decide 
what Church they prefer to attend regularly. 



42> 



OTHER ORGANIZATIONS 



THE LITERARY SOCIETIES 

Meredith's two literary societies, the Astrotekton 
and the Philaretian, work together in friendly- 
rivalry throughout the year. Their purpose is to 
help the students to combine their academic train- 
ing in a practical manner with their social life, and 
to promote a useful experience in outside cultural 
interests. 

These societies have separate halls, in which they 
meet for an hour on every Saturday night to enjoy 
clever programs or more informal fun. In order 
to stimulate the spirit of loyalty and develop ini- 
tiative among the students, both societies present 
plays every year. During the past year the Astro- 
tekton Society gave the operetta, Snow-White, 
while the Philaretians presented She Stoops to 
Conquer. With their many good times, these 
societies constitute one of the most enjoyable 
features of college life at Meredith. 

OFFICERS OF THE ASTROTEKTON 
LITERARY SOCIETY 

Frances Johnston President 

Eugenia Thomas Vice-President 

Annie Hall Baity Secretary 

Madge Daniels Treasurer 

OFFICERS OF THE PHILARETIAN 
LITERARY SOCIETY 

Rose Martin President 

Mattie Gunter Vice-President 

Moultrie Drake Secretary 

Margaret Stroud Treasurer 

44 



ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT 

OFFICERS FOR 1919-1920 

Eunice Homewood President 

Mae McMillan Vice-President 

Lillian Franklin Secretary 

Alberta Lamm Treasurer 

Everybody together on this yell! 
"Riffity, raffity, riff, raff 
Chiffity, chaffity, chiff, chaff, 
Riff, raff, chiff, chaff 
Three cheers for Athletics!" 

Girls, start right by going in for Athletics, good 
and strong, the day you enter. Adjust your 
academic program to your athletic program instead 
of vice versa! 

There's nothing like class spirit, and nothing 
that develops it like contests in basket ball, relay 
races, tennis, tournaments, tracks meets, etc.! 

From the middle of October until Field Day 
in May, regular gymnasium exercises are required 
of all students, except Seniors, for two days each 
week. 

BASKET BALL! 

Each class has a team which practices regularly 
throughout the coUege year. In the spring inter- 
class games are played for the championships. A 
loving cup is awarded the winning team. 

TENNIS 

There are two tennis courts between the Home 
Economics Building and North Cottage. Each 
45 



class has a tennis team of two numbers, and the; 
are tried out. The winning team receives mono 
grams presented by the Association. This yea 
the Freshman team won the championship an( 
received the monograms. 

FIELD DAY 

This is our big hoKday! Every student wh( 
has taken gymnasium may compete in the events 
There are two honors awarded for each of the tw( 
features rendered by the different classes. Thes< 
are called first and second honors, which are blu( 
and red ribbons bearing the name of class anc 
feature on it. 

Other features of field day exercises are the 
May Pole Drill, races, games and a general bi^ 
time. 

Come on and let's have one more good spicy yell, 

Let's go, 1, 2, 3. 

''Hibbilty, hibbilty, huss. 
We're not allowed to fuss 
But nevertheless we must confess 
That we're the best of all the rest, 
Meredith! Meredith! Meredith!" 



46 



STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

The Acorn is the monthly magazine of the stu- 
lents, published by the Astrotekton and Philaretian 
literary Societies. The object of the magazine 
3 to create an effort at seK-expression among the 
tudents as well as to encourage training along 
iterary lines. It is a source of encouragement to 
hose who are making their best efforts in the 
ilnglish Department, and a challenge to those who 
ire not. The Acorn is associated with similar 
nagazines by means of exchange. Every member 
)f the societies receives the magazine on the pay- 
nent of the membership fee. It will also be 
nailed to any address, the proper arrangements 
lai'ing been made with the business manager. 

The following girls form The Acorn staff: 

Eva Dean Editor-in-Chief 

Mamie Careoll Associate Editor 

Margaret Pope 



^ , Junior Editors 

LiDiE Penton ) 

Ruth Goldsmith ) „ , t^, ,., 

^ - Sovhomore Editors 

iLETHIA FeLTON ) 

Mattie Gunter Business Manager 

Thelma Lee Assistant Business Manager 

The Oah Leaves, also published by the literary 
societies, is the college annual. It represents every 
ohase of coUege hfe, not being, like The Acorn, 
primarily of a literary nature. While each organi- 
zation of the students has its place in the annual, 
the Senior Class justly occupies the foremost place. 
47 



{■ Junior Editor 



The following girls form the Annual staff: 

DoEOTHY Bland Editor-in-Chu 

Y^Kate Shipman Associate Editc 

Glenn Ward Business Manage 

Margaret Stroud. . . .Assistant Business Manage 

Mary Lynne Judd 

VJeannette Biggs 

Bertha Moore } ^ , ^ , ., 

-TV ^ c bovhomore Editor 

Beth Carroll .• • . > 

Frank Martin Art Edito 

BUDGET 

The second Monday in October will be pay-daj 
All dues for all organizations must be paid that daj 
They are as follows: 

Student Government $0.75 

Y. W. C. A 1.00 

Society 2.00 

Annual 3 . 50 

Athletic Association 25 

*Total $7.50 

*Society initiation fee for new girls $1.00 

ALMA MATER 

We salute thee, Alma Mater, w^e salute thee wit: 

a song. 
At thy feet our loyal hearts, their tribute lay; 
We had waited for thy coming, in the darknet 

waited long, 
Ere the morning star proclaimed thy natal day. 
48 



hou hast come through tribulation, and thy robe 

is clean and white, 
hou art fairer than the summer in its bloom, 
hou art born unto a kingdom, and thy crown is 

all of light; 
hou shalt smile away the shadow and the gloom. 

I thy paths the fields shall blossom and the desert 

shall rejoice, 
I the wilderness a living, fountain spring, 
Dr the blind shall see thy beauty, and the deaf 

shall hear thy voice, 
ad the silent tongues their high hozannas sing. 

'here the rhododendron blushes on the burly 
mountain's breast, 
the midland where the wild deer love to roam; 
j'here the water-lily slumbers while the cypress 

guards its rest, 
), thy sunny land of promise and thy home. 

here the sons of Carolina taught a Nation to be 

free, 
id her daughters taught their brothers to be 

brave; 
er a land of peaceful plenty, from the highlands 

to the sea, 
ay thy banner. Alma Mater, ever wave. 

R. T. Vann. 



49 



EFIRD'S 



j 

I You are always welcome at Efird's 

j WE SELL 

I LADIES READY-TO-WEAR, 

1 SHOES, SILKS, NOTIONS, 

I PIECE GOODS, ETC ETC. 

J money refunded for 

I unsatisfactory purchases 



WE SELL IT FOR LESS" 

EFIRD'S DEPARTMENT STORE 

208 FAYETTVILLE ST. RALEIGH, N. C. 



DUNN-MARSH & THOMPSON 

INCORPORATED 



! Tf^holesale Grocers 

I 

f 

I 311 W. MARTIN STREET 

i RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

\ 



STUDENTS' HAND BOOK 



OF 



MEREDITH COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

1921-1922 




ELITCE 

Baeee Pritchett 

business manager 

Madge Hedrick 



RALEIGH 

Edwaeds & Bkoughton Peinting Co. 

1921 



ALMA MATER | 

We salute thee, Alma Mater, we salute theei| 
with a song, ! 

At thy feet our loyal hearts," their tribute lay;;' 

We had waited for thy coming, in the darkness ^ 
waited long, 

Ere the morning star proclaimed thy natal day. 

Thou hast come through tribulation, and thy 

robe is clean and white, 
Thou art fairer than the summer in its bloom. 
Thou art born unto a kingdom, and thy crown 

is all of light; 
Thou Shalt smile away the shadow and the 

gloom. 

In thy paths the fields shall blossom and the 

desert shall rejoice. 
In the wilderness a living fountain spring, 
For the !blind shall see thy beauty, and the; 

deaf shall hear thy voice, i 

And the silent tongues their high hozannas 

sing. 

Where the rhododendron blushes on the burly 

mountain's breast. 
In the midland where the wild deer love to 

roam ; 
Where the water-lily slumbers while the cypress 

guards its rest, 
Lo, thy sunny land of promise and thy home. 

Where the sons of Carolina taught a Nation to 

be free, 
And her daughters taught their brothers to be 

brave ; 
O'er the land of peaceful plenty, from the high-| 

lands to the sea. 
May thy banner, Alma Mater, ever wave. 

R. T. Vann. 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Alma Mater 2 

A Day's Program 4 

Social Calendar 5 

Y. W. C. A. Invitation 6 

Student Government Department 7 

Officers, House Presidents, etc 8 

Constitution 10 

By-laws 16 

Student Regulations 18 

Student Standards 22 

Student Honor 22 

Delinquencies 23 

Privileges 24 

a. Shopping and Walking 24 

b. Social 24 

c. Moving Pictures 25 

d. Visiting in the Dormitory 25 

e. Church 25 

f. Sophomore Privileges 26 

g. Junior Privileges 26 

h. Senior Privileges 27 

Miscellaneous 27 

a. Order of Classification 27 

b. Fire Department 28 

Supplement to Hand Book 30 

Other Organizations 35 

Welcome from '28 to '25 36 

Y. W. C. A 37 

Departmental Work 39 

The Cabinet Policy 44 

Why You Should Join the Y. W. C. A. . 46 

"Hints to the Wise" 46 

Churches 48 

The Student Volunteer Band 48 

Athletic Association 50 

Literary Societies 51 

Student Publications 53 

Budget 55 

3 



A DAY'S PROGRAM 

A. M. 

Rising bell 6:45 

First breakfast bell 7:30 

Breakfast 7: 45 

Chapel 8:35 

First class 9 : 00 

Second class 10 : 00 

Third class 11 : 00 

Fourth class 12 : 00 

p. M. 

Lunch 1:00 

Fifth class 1:30 

Laboratory 2:30 

First dinner bell 5:45 

Dinner 6:00 

Study hour 7:45 

Visiting bell 10 : 00 

Room bell 10:15 

Light bell 10:30 



SOCIAL CALENDAR 
Fall: 

For new girls especially — 

S. G. and Y. W. C. A. reception. 

"Y" room entertainments. 

Society reception and entertainments. 
Church, receptions. 
State Fair holidays. 
Wake Forest Society Day. 
State College receptions. 
Stunt night. 

Inter-class basket-ball games. 
Society Day. 
Y. W. C. A. Christmas party. 

Spring : 

Founders' Day. 

Student Government Association reception. 

Wake Forest Anniversary. 

Y. W. C. A. reception. 

Class entertainments. 

Tennis tournaments. 

Field Day. 



You are cordially invited to attend 

the 

Informal Reception 

Given to New Students 

by the 

Student Government 

and 

Young Women's Christian Association 

at 

eight o'clock P. M. 

Saturday, September tenth. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 
DEPARTMENT 



OFFICERS 

President Beth Carroll 

Vice-President Minnie Hallowell 

Secretary Bernice White 

Treasurer. . .- Daphne Owens 

HOUSE PRESIDENTS 

Main Building — Carolyn Mercer, President; 
Alice Lowe, Sub-President. 

Faircloth Hall — Mary Bennet, President; Low- 
ney Olive, Sub-President. 

East Building — ^Alma Clay, President; Juanita 
Arnette, Sub-President. 

Hyatt House — Louise Bowden, President. 
Fire Chief — Katherine Gibbs. 
Cheer Leader — 

COMMITTEES 

Ideals — Beulah Rowland, Chairman; Eliza- 
beth Kimsey, Carey Cox, Myrtle Parrish. 

Social — Erma Moore, Chairman; Mary Eliza- 
beth Sullivan, Iola Wall, Rachael Wilkin- 
son. 

Music — Helen Sentelle — ^Cheer-leader; Beulah " 
Rowland, Lois Kendrick — Assistant cheer- 
leaders; Mabel West, Elizabeth Kendrick. i 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT 

Student Government means all the Meredith ^ 
girls, with a real Meredith sense of honor, 
working together to make Meredith the best 
college possible. 

The spirit of the Student Association is the 
real college spirit, and a loyal student spirit 
means not only a co-operating student organi- 
zation, but clean athletics, an enthusiastic 
Y. W. 0. A., and a working literary society. 
The success of any organization in college de- 
pends on the attitude of the girls toward the 
Student Government Association. We must 
work together for the common good of all be- 
fore we can work in groups in smaller organi- 
zations. 

Every individual girl is responsible for the 
carrying out of the laws of the Student Gov 
emment. These laws are made by the students 
themselves, and approved by the faculty. Dis- 
regard of these laws means that a girl is not 
a loyal member of the college community and 
is not worthy of the privileges of the same. 
The Student Government encourages loyalty to 
all organizations, promptness in all duties, and 
a spirit of love and friendship among the girls. 



CONSTITUTION 

ARTICLE I 

NAME 

This Association shall be called the Student 
Government Association of Meredith College. 

ARTICLE II 
object 
The object of this Association shall be the 
government of the student body. 

ARTICLE III 
membership 

(a) All students who are seventeen years of 
age shall, upon registration at Meredith, be- 
come members of the Student Government As- 
sociation. 

(6) All students who are not seventeen years 
of age shall, upon registration at Meredith, be- 
come associate members of the Student Gov- 
ernment Association. 

ARTICLE IV 

officers — their election and duties 
Section 1. The officers of the Association shall 
consist of a President, a Vice-President, a Sec- 
retary, and a Treasurer. 



10 



Sec. 2. (a) The President shall be chosen 
from the incoming Senior class. 

(b) The officers and House Presidents shall 
be elected by ballot at the annual meeting held 
the second Monday in March, except the presi- 

i dent who shall be elected ten days previous to 
i the above date, followed by the nomination and 
election of the Y. W. C, A., Athletic, and Society 
Presidents and the Editors-in-chief of the Stu- 
dent Publications in the order above mentioned. 
These major officers of the college organizations 
shall have been elected and the nominations 
for minor Student Government officers posted 
three days before the second Monday in March. 

(c) The officers shall enter upon their duties 
the fifteenth of April. 

Sec. 3 (a) It shall be the duty of the Presi- 
dent to preside over all meetings of the Asso- 
ciation and of the Executive Committee, to 
appoint any call meetings she may consider 
necessary, and to appoint all committees not 
otherwise provided for in these articles. 

(&) The duties of the Vice-President shall be 
the same as those of the President, should the 
President at any time be unable to perform her 
duties. 

(c) It shall be the duty of the Secretary to 
record the proceedings of all meetings of the 
Association and of the Executive Committee, 
to post all official notices, to submit to the Dean 
the lists of members and associate members, 

11 



oflacers, committees, and other bodies appointed 
by the Association. 

(d) It shall be the duty of the Treasurer to 
keep a strict and permanent account of all 
receipts and expenditures, to collect fines, to 
present a report at the annual meeting of the 
Association, and to perform other duties that 
may devolve upon her as Treasurer of the 
Association. 

ARTICLE V 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 

Section 1. The Executive Committee shall 
consist of the officers of the Association and 
the House Presidents. 

Sec. 2 (a) It shall be the duty of the Exec- 
utive Committee to meet every four weeks, to 
enforce the rules of the Association, and to con- 
sider business of that body. 

(&) It shall be the duty of the Executive 
Committee to divide the corridors into dis- 
tricts, and to determine the tenure of oflace of 
the proctors. 

(c) The Executive Committee may, at its dis- 
cretion, summon before it and reprimand any 
member or members of the Association. The 
committee shall have the right to withdraw 
privileges and to impose penalties. These, how- 
ever, shall be reported to the Advisory Com- 
mittee before being put into effect. The pen- 
alties of public reprimand, demerits, suspension 
and expulsion shall be subject to the approval 



12 



i 



of the faculty or a committee representing the 
faculty. 

id) It shall be the duty of the Executive 
Committee to consider proposed regulations 
and to refer such as are approved to the Aca- 
demic Council for their approval or disapproval. 
The Academic Council agrees to pass no regula- 
tions except such as have heen passed by the 
Executive Committee. 

Sec. 3. (a) The Advisory Committee shall 
consist of the Dean of Women and two members 
of the faculty. 

(&) The duties of the Advisory Committee 
shall be to receive reports from the Executive 
Committee and to confer with that committee 
whenever occasion may demand. 

Sec. 4. The Nominating Committee shall be 
composed of the presidents of the various col- 
lege organizations; that is, of the Student Gov- 
ernment Association, of the Y. W. C. A., of 
the Athletic Association, of the two Societies, 
and representatives from the classes and col- 
lege publications. The president of the Stu- 
dents Government Association shall act as 
chairman. 

ARTICLE VI 

MEETINGS 

Section 1. (a) A meeting shall be held as 
soon as possible after the beginning of the 
college year, at which time the Constitution, 
By-Laws, and Regulations shall be read and 
explained. 

13 



(&) A meeting shall be held the first Monday 
in March for the election of officers. 

(c) A meeting of the Association shall be 
called once each month for reports from the 
Executive Committee and discussion by the 
members. 

Sec. 2. Meetings of the Association may be 
called at any time by the President on her own 
motion, and must be called by her on the 
written request of ten members. The object of 
these special meetings shall be stated in writing 
when the request is made. 

ARTICLE VII 

JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT 

Section 1. The judicial power of the Associa- 
tion shall be vested in — 

(a) The Association, which shall constitute 
a higher court, and which shall be a Court of 
Appeal from the decisions of the Executive 
Committee. 

(b) The Executive Committee, which shall 
constitute the lower court, and from which 
alone an appeal to the whole Association may 
be made. 

ARTICLE VIII 

Quorum 

Section 1. (a) One-third of the members of 
the Association shall constitute a quorum for 
the transaction of ordinary business. 

14 



(&) Two-thirds of the members of the Asso- 
ciation shall constitute a quorum for the annual 
meeting in March, for any meeting in which 
an amendment or change in the Constitution 
is voted on, and when the Association is acting 
in its judicial capacity. 

ARTICLE IX 

AMENDMENTS 

Section 1. An amendment may be proposed 
by the faculty, by the Student Executive Com- 
mittee, or by any fifteen members of the As- 
sociation. The proposed amendment shall be 
posted at least one week before it is presented 
to the Association, and shall be approved by 
the faculty of the college before its adoption. 



15 



BY-LAWS 



I. 

The rules contained in Roberts' Rules of 
Order shall govern the Association in all busi- 
ness meetings. 

II. 

(a) The annual dues of the Association shall 
be one dollar and twenty-five cents. 

(&) A fine of ten cents shall be imposed 
upon any member of the Association who is 
absent from a meeting without an excuse ac- 
ceptable to the Executive Committee. 

III. 

(a) Nominations for officers shall be posted 
at least three days before election. 

(&) A plurality of votes cast shall elect all 
officers of the Association. 

IV. 

(a) Each college dormitory shall be divided 
into districts, each of which shall have a proc- 
tor. There shall be a House President for each 
house and a sub-House President. 

(&) The House President, together with the 
proctors of the house, shall form a House Coun- 
cil, whose duties shall be to enforce all rules 
of the Association pertaining to the govern- 
ment of the house. 

(c) Each House President shall require every 



16 



student in her house within two weeks after 
the opening of the Fall semester to sign the 
following statement: "I have read the Consti- 
tution, By-Laws, and Regulations of the Stu- 
dent Government Association. I realize that I 
am on my honor to keep and enforce the rules 
of the Association, and I pledge myself to ob- 
serve the same and to try to be a consistent 
member." When any associate member shall 
have attained the age of seventeen years, she 
shall become a regular member of the Associa- 
tion, upon notifying her House President. 

(d) There shall be regular meetings of the 
House Council every two weeks. 

(e) Proctors will not give permissions. 

(/) The sub-House President shall act in the 
absence of the House President and assist her 
as occasion demands. 

STUDENT COUNCIL 

In addition to the Student Government Ex- 
ecutive Committee, there has been organized 
a Student Council, composed of the Student 
Government Executive Committee, the Presi- 
dents of the major student organizations, the 
editors-in-chief of the student publications, and 
the class representatives. The purpose of this 
board is to study and solve the problems of 
the college community. 



17 



STUDENT REGULATIONS 

Students are under the college regulations 
from the time they reach the college until 
they take the train to learn Raleigh, or until 
they have received permission from the Dean 
of Women to visit in the city at Christmas 
vacation or at the close of the session. 

i house rules 
1 — Bells. 

(a) The rising bell will ring at 6:45 a. m; 
the retiring bell at 10:30 p. m. at the ringing 
of the retiring bell all lights will be extin- 
guished, students will retire and the house be 
quiet until the rising bell. No extra time will 
be given after 10:30. 

(6) Visiting bell will ring at 10:00 p. m; 
first room bell at 10:10 p. m; and last room 
bell at 10:15 p. m. 

2 — Quiet. 

(a) Quiet must be observed during Silent 
Hour (2:00 p. m. to 4:30 p. m.) on Sunday 
afternoon, and during the Study Hours of the 
day and night. 

(6) Under no circumstances will visiting 
during the Sunday Silent Hour be allowed, un- 
less permission has been obtained from the 
House President before 2 o'clock. 

(c) Pianos may not be used on Sunday 
Mornings. 

18 



I 



3 — ^DlNING-ROOM. 

(a) The dining-room doors shall he closed 
five minutes after the last bell rings. 
4 — Guests. 

(a) No student will entertain guests in her 
room. All visitors will he entertained in the 
parlors. No young lady will go to the parlors 
to meet friends without permission from the 
Dean of Women except during calling hours. 

(&) Because of the lack of guest chambers, 
students may not entertain their friends over 
night at the college without the permission of 
the Dean of Women. 
5 — Maids. 

(a) No student may, without permission 
from the Housekeeper, have colored women 
come to her room or to the dormitory corri- 
dors,, as their is danger of loss of money or 
clothes. 
6 — Dress. 

(a) White middy blouses and dark skirts, or 
any kind of washable middle suit may not be 
worn to Sunday dinner, on the Streets at any 
time, or elsewhere after 4:30, except in the 
dormitory halls — Regulation serge middy suits 
may be worn except on Fayetteville Street, in 
the parlors, and on Sunday after 1:00 p. m; 
or on occasions when they would be inappro- 
priate. 
7 — Cooking. 

(a) Chafing dishes with alcohol burners, or 
electrical appliances may not be used in the 
bedrooms — A kitchenette and pressing room 
19 



will be provided in each building where cook- 
ing, pressing, etc., may be done. A charge of 
five cents an hour will be made for the use 
of electric plates or irons. 
8 — Telephones and Telegrams. 

(a) The telephone number 530, is to be used 
only by Seniors and members of the Executive 
Committee. Other classmen must use the' pay 
station. 

(&) Permission to send telegrams or long-dis- 
tance messages may be obtained from the Dean 
of Women during her office hours, or from the 
Secretary to the President. Such messages 
must be paid for in advance. 

II CAMPUS RULES 

1. Students may not be off the Campus when 
due for any college duty. 
2. — Registering. 

(a) Students will not leave the college 
grounds without registering, except for walk- 
ing or working at the State or Raney Library. 

(6) Students will register in the office of the 
Dean of Women when exercising any special 
privilege off the campus, such as attending 
receptions, ball games etc. 

(c) Students will register for dates whenever 
having them. 
3. — Walking and Shopping. 

(a) During the first six weeks in the fall, 
Freshmen must be accompanied by old girls 
when walking off the campus or Shopping. 

20 



(&) students may not walk in the business 
sections of the city, on Fayetteville and Hills- 
boro streets, in the Capitol Square, in or near 
the vicinity of the railroad shops, or station 
unless they have registered to go shopping. 
4. — Social. 

(a) When visiting, students may leave the 
college Saturday when work is finished, but 
they must be at the college for work Monday 
morning. 

(&) No visits out of the city will be made 
without a written permission from parent or 
guardian stating to whom the visit is to be 
made. This should be mailed directly to the 
President or Dean of Women. 

(c) No one may visit in town over night 
during Fair holidays, except with members of 
the immediate family. 

(fZ) Students may not sit with young men 
in chapel at any function under the auspices 
of the college, but may do so when it is under 
the auspices of a student organization. 
5. — Chapel and Church Attendance. 

(a) Students should be in their places when 
the three-minute bell stops ringing. Talking 
is forbidden after the organist begins playing. 
No books will be taken into chapel. 

(b) For those who do not attend voluntarily 
Sunday School and church services on Sunday 
mornings at least eighty-five per cent of the 
time, roll-call attendance is required. 



21 



(c) students are allowed to attend other 
churches than the church home five Sundays 
out of the year. Permission must he obtained 
from the Dean of Women if the student desires 
to attend more than five Sundays. 

STUDENT STANDARDS 

1. Students do not carry on a conversation 
with young men on the campus, at the libraries, 
at the drug stores, or on the Street. 

2. Students do not communicate with young 
men by word or sign, beyond simple recogni- 
tion, from any part of the building or grounds, 
or elsewhere. 

3. Students do not send any matter to the 
local press for publication without the permis- 
sion of the Dean of Women; and all posters, 
invitations, or other printed matter must be 
approved by her or some member of the facul- 
ty. 

4. Students do not visit restaurants, hotels, 
railroad stations, or places of amusement with- 
out permission and a chaperon. 

STUDENT HONOR 

1. Hazing is absolutely forbidden. Any in- 
terference by one class with another class, or 
by the members of one class with the members 
of another, is included in the term "hazing." 

2. The punishment for cheating on examina- 
tion, or elsewhere, will be expulsion, withdraw- 
al of credits, or demerits, or a combination of 

22 



the last two, at the discretion of the Academic 
Council and Student Executive Committee. 

3. Dancing and card-playing will not be per- 
mitted. In regard to these, there is a differ- 
ence of opinion, but all will agree that it is 
safe to replace them by other recreations. 

4. Sororites of whatever name or kind, 
whether regular or irregular, affliliating with 
similar organizations elsewhere or unaffiliating, 
are absolutely prohiMted. The punishment for 
this offense will be expulsion, demerits, or sus- 
pension, or a coTTibination of any of these at the 
discretion of the Academic Council and Student 
Executive Committee. 

DELINQUENCIES 

1. Each unexcused absence or tardiness from 
any college duty, such as registering for shop- 
ping or for any special privilege, will count 
as one delinquent, except absence from chapel 
which will count as two. 

2. Any student receiving nine delinquencies 
during any quarter will be debarred from ex- 
ercising the privileges of the Student Govern- 
ment Association for four weeks. Students 
receiving nine during the last quarter will lose 
their privileges for the two weeks before com- 
mencement. 

3. Students will report, within three days, to 
the Dean of Women to be excused for any ab- 
sence or tardiness; otherwise, these will go 
on the college record as unexcused delinquen- 



23 



PRIVILEGES 

In order to exercise the privileges of the 
Student Government Association each student's 
parent or guardian must have notified the Dean 
of Women of his permission for his daughter 
to exercise these privileges. This permission 
should be mailed directly to the President or 
the Dean of Women. 

All students having the necessary permis- 
sions may exercise the following privileges: 

"-'^ SHOPPING AND WALKING 

1. May shop in groups of two on Monday 
afternoon, or the afternoon convenient to sched- 
.ule. 

2. Students may walk after 4:30 on Sunday 
afternoons in the northern and eastern part 
at town. 

SOCIAL 

1. May receive visits from friends on Monday 
afternoons from 3:30 to 5:30 or on Saturday 
evenings after Society, provided they go to 
Society. 

2. May dine with friends in town any two 
Saturday evenings during a semester; may dine 
down town with young men, with a chaperon 
approved hy the Dean of Women, one evening 
during a semester. 

3. May make calls in town any one afternoon 
in the week, provided the Dean of Women is 
notified before such calls are made. 

4. May make week-end visits in the homes 

24 



of friends four times a year and in the homes 
of near relatives once a month. ("Near rela- 
tives" will be interpreted to mean grand- 
parents, brothers, or sisters.) 

5. When visiting in the city, students may 
appear on the streets or in public gatherings 
with young men if chaperons have been ap- 
proved by the Dean of Women. The hostess 
is considered an approved chaperon. 

6. May take part in studio parties twice a 
semester. 

7. With the permission of the Dean of Wo- 
men students may go driving on any afternoon 
with young men, provided a chaperon approved 
by the Dean of Women has been secured. 

8. Students may spend Sundays in town 
and let them count as week-ends. 

MOVING PICTURES 

1. Students may attend moving picture shows 
one afternoon a month with faculty or ap- 
proved student chaperon. No chaperon should 
have more than six girls in her party. 

VISITING IN THE DORMITORY 
1. With the permission of the House Presi- 
dent, girls may spend the night with friends 
in the same or other buildings. Saturday and 
Sunday nights permission is unnecessary pro- 
vided the whereabouts of the visiting girl are 
known by the room-mate. 

CHURCH 
1. Girls may choose any church as a church 

25 



home within the first three weeks after school 
opens and register the same on their schedule 
cards. 

2. Beginning with the second semester, Fresh- 
men, who are regular attendants at college 
religious services, may attend church at night 
with a chaperon. 

SOPHOMORE PRIVILEGES 

Besides the above privileges the Sophomores 
have the following: 

1. The class may have one evening off dur- 
ing the session, provided no member of the 
class is guilty of hazing in any manner what- 
ever. 

2. Members of the class may attend church 
at night with a chaperon. 

3. May shop any one afternoon. 

JUNIOR PRIVILEGES 

In addition the Juniors have the following 
special privileges: 

1. Approved Juniors may chaperon where- 
ever student chaperonage is permissable. 

2. Members of the class may go to the den- 
tist and oculist in groups of two. 

3. May attend church Sunday night in groups 
of three without a chaperon. 

4. May receive callers any one afternoon or 
evening except Sunday. 

5. May shop any two afternoons. 

26 



6. May go to the movies at night twice a 
semester with a chaperon. 

SENIOR PRIVILEGES 
In addition the Seniors have the following 
special privileges: 

1. May walk and shop alone any time of the 
day. 

2. May receive callers any two afternoons or 
any two evenings in the week except Sunday, 
or with the permission of the Dean of Women 
may spend the afternoon or evening away from 
the college. 

3. May go to ball games, matinees, and pic- 
tures in groups of three without a chaperon. 

4. May occasionally spend a Sunday in town. 

5. May have one extra week-end during the 
last six weeks. 

6. May go to church Sunday evenings in 
groups of three unchaperoned. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Order of Classification 

1. Go to the President's office and register. 

2. Then go across the hall to the Bursar's of- 
fice and pay your matriculation fee of twenty- 
five dollars which is necessary before you can 
be classified. 

3. In return for this the Bursar will give 
you a receipt, which you must carry with you 
to the Dean's office, where you will be classi- 
fied. 

27 



DON'T 

Don't you come to Meredith, 
With the blues all on your face, 

But just you force a big, broad grin, 
And then you'll like the place. 

Don't forget you're Meredith, 
And Meredith's judged by you, 

So be careful at your windows. 
And your critics will be few. 

Don't forget to study. 

And to work as hard as sin, 
And when you leave old Meredith, 

Folks'll know where you have been. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

There shall be a Fire Department main- 
tained in college under the direction of the 
Student Government Association. 

Each student is required to attend all drills. 
Regulations are posted in all rooms. 

Section 1. Officers— Their election and du- 
ties: 

(1) There shall be a Fire Chief chosen from 
the Senior class and elected by the student 
body. 

(2) There shall be a Captain in each build- 
ing elected by the Student Executive Commit- 
tee. 

(3) There shall be as many First and Sec- 
ond Lieutenants in each building as deemed 

28 



OTHER ORGANIZATIONS 



WELCOME FROM '23 TO '25. 

Dear Little Sisters: — 

We, the Juniors are looking forward with 
much pleasure to welcoming you into our col- 
lege home. As your "Big Sisters," we are 
of course more than anxious to see you and 
show you just how delightful college life is. 

You'll find the Seniors dignified, and the 
"Sophs" trying to scare you "out o' your wits", 
but the Juniors will always be ready to help 
you any time just like "sho' nuff" sisters. 
We know that we are going to be mighty proud 
of you, our "Little Sisters of '25." 
Loyally, 

Your Junior Sisters 



86 






YOUNG WOMEN'S 
CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



MOTTO 

"2Voi by might nor by j)ower, but by 
My Spirit, saith the Lord of Hosts." 

GREETING 

Through these pages we extend a most hearty 
welcome, in the name of the One for whose 
glory our Association is founded, to all students 
entering Meredith this fall. It is the earnest 
prayer of the committee that the associational 
work not only may be a blessing to you, but also 
that you may be a blessing to the Association. 

OFFICERS 

Ruth Couch President 

Ruby Spaijsthouk Vice-President 

DeLh^a Deato]!^ Secretary 

Myrtle Parrish Treasurer 

Gladys Leonard Undergraduate Secretary 

departments and committees 

I. Membership — Ruby Spainhour 
(a) Fall Campaign Committee. 
(&) New Girls Committee. 

II. Finance — Mary Sullivan. 

27 



III. PulUcity — Saeah Nooe. 

(a) Bulletin Board — ^Sarah Nooe. 
(&) Library and Publication— Cakbie 
Pierce. 

(c) Poster — Elizabeth Gordon. 

(d) Editor — Fannie Paul. 

IV. Religious Work — Claudeline Sykes. 

(a) Meetings 

1. Sunday night — Claudeline Sykes. 

2. Music — Joscelyn Oox. 

3. B. Y. P. U.— 

(&) Bidle Study — Elizabeth Kendrick. 

1. Group. 

2. Individual. 

V. Social — Louise Mays. 

(a) Hospitality — Doris Jeffries. 
(&) Social Standards — Louise Mays. 
(c) Blue Ridge — Phyllis Mays. 
{d) "Y" Room — Margaret Fleming. 

VI. Community Service — Doris Tillery. 
(a) On Campus — Winnie Mae Rowland. 
(6) Off Campus — Erma Moore. 

VII. Young Women's Auxiliary. 
Margaret Duncan — President. 
Dorothy Gower — Vice-President. 
Margaret Wyatt — Secretary-Treasurer. 

ADVISORY BOARD 
Miss Evelyn Campbell 
Miss Beatrice Teague 



*To be elected. 



DEPARTMENTAL WORK 

MEMBERSHIP DEPARTMENT 

Ruby Spainhour — Chairman. 

It is the purpose of the membership depart- 
ment to create and maintain the vital interest 
of girls in Association work, and to enlist them 
as true members of the Y. W. C. A. At the 
beginning of the Fall term the girls of this 
department are in charge of the Information 
Bureau, and it is their desire to do everything 
possible to help the new girls, to make them 
feel perfectly at home, and above all, to make 
them realize that with their hearty co-opera- 
tion in our college Y. W. C. A. much greater 
things can be accomplished. We need you 
girls ! 

FINANCE DEPARTMENT 

Mary Sullivan — Chairman 
This department has charge of the finances 
of the Y. W. C. A. and keeps a systematic ac- 
count of all receipts and expenditures. 

The following budget was carried out during 
1920-21: 

INCOME 

75 Million Campaign $779.30 

Dues 303.00 

39 



I 



"Y" Stores 532.45 

General Receipts 94.90 

Pledges 351.27 

Total $2060.92 

EXPENDITUEES 

7'5 Million Campaign $779.30 

"Y" Room 164.11 

Printing 38.90 

Annual 80.98 

South Atlantic Field 120.00 

Literature 16.79 

Departmental 140.83 

Conventions & Conferences 87.00 

General 80.52 

Chinese Relief Fund 351.27 

Total $1859.70 

PUBLICITY DEPARTMENT 

Sarah Nooe — Chairman 
The work of the publicity Department is car- 
ried on through four committees, the Bulletin 
Board Committee, the Library and Publication 
Committee, the Poster committee and the Edi- 
torial committee. 

The Bulletin Board Committee keeps the 
girls informed concerning college happenings, 
current events and Y. W. C. A, interests, by 
clippings and announcements placed on the Y.j 
W. C. A. Bulletin Board. 
40 



The Poster committee, by means of attrac- 
tive posters, announces the various Y. W. C. A. 
meetings. 

The Library and publication committee has 
charge of our "Y" Library, which consists of 
a few magazines and good books. This com- 
mittee also maintains the current event sec- 
tion of the Bulletin Board. 

The Editor gives Y. W. C. A. items of special 
interest to the local newspapers and college 
publications. 

In short, the publicity Department is the 
Information Bureau of the campus. 

RELIGIOUS WORK DEPARTMENT 

Claudiune Sykes — Chairman 
The work of the Religious Department is 
carried on through three committees. These 
are: Program committee, Music committee, and 
Bible Study committee. 

It is the work of the Program committee to 
arrange programs for regular meetings on Sun- 
day night. Speakers are selected from the stu- 
dent body, faculty, or from outside sources. 
These programs are not only interesting to 
everyone but they suggest the necessity of 
Christ in our lives today and how we may 
work with him in the upbuilding of humanity, 
A special Missionary program is given on the 
first Sunday night of each month. 
The Music committee has charge of the 

41 



choir for each religious meeting. This com- 
mittee arranges for soloists and for special 
programs. 

The Bible Study committee arranges Bible 
classes for study during Fall semester, select- 
ing leaders and books for each class. 

B. Y. P. U. 

The B. Y. P. U. of Meredith College was or- 
ganized February the twentynseventh, nineteen 
hundred and twenty-one with about one hun- 
dred and forty girls as charter members. The 
Union was divided into three sections, named 
for three former Meredith Students who are 
now on the foreign fields — in Japan, China 
and Africa, respectively. The names are — The 
Foy Willingham, the Celia Herring and The 
Rosa Hocutt B. Y. P. U's. The unions meet 
every Wednesday evening taking the place of 
the mid-week Vesper Service held prior to the 
organization of the B. Y. P. U. The three 
Unions will attain every Point on the Stan- 
dard of Excellence before Oommencement. 
The chief aim of the B. Y. P. U. of Meredith 
is to train our girls for active church worki 
at home, to acquaint them with our own de-l 
nominational work in a very specific manner 
and to discover hidden talents. 

SOCIAL DEPARTMENT 

Louise Mays — Chairman \ 

The work of this department is to arrange 

42 A 



for all the social functions of the Association, 
including the parties in our "Y" room for the 
new girls. Its work also includes the creating 
and developing of college standards of the very 
highest type. 

The Blue Ridge Committee does great work 
in arranging good programs to interest the 
girls in the conference held at Blue Ridge, and 
also has charge of all the teas that are given 
for this cause. 

COMMUNITY SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

Doris Tillery — Chairman 

The purpose of the Community Service De- 
partment is, as the name implies, service. In 
the college community the committee endeavors 
to unite the girls through a spirit of fellow- 
ship in Christian service, rendered both among 
themselves and to the community at large. It 
is also the duty of the committee to keep the 
student body as a whole in touch with all cur- 
rent social movements, in order that the work 
of the community may be in harmony with 
that of the world. 

YOUNG WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 
Margaret Duncan — President 

The Young Woman's Auxiliary, an organiza- 
tion within itself, assumes responsibility for the 
missionary training of the Young Woman's 
Christian Association. 

43 



Its meetings, on the first Sunday evening 
of each month, seek to give a vision of world 
needs and responsibility for meeting these needs. 

The close aflBliation with the State Y. W. A. 
organization gives a young woman ready knowl- 
edge of her denominational opportunities. 

THE CABINET POLICY 

Aim of the Association: 

(a) To unite the women of the institution in 
loyalty to Jesus Christ. 

(ft) To lead them to accept Him as their per- 
sonal Savior. 

(c) To build them up in the knowledge of 
Christ, especially through Bible study and 
Christian service, that their character and 
conduct may be consonant with their belief. 
It shall thus associate them with the students 
of the world for the advancement of the King- 
dom of God. J 

id) To seek to enlist their devotion to the 
Christian Church and to the religious work of 
the institution. 
Aim of the CaUnet: 

To carry out the purpose of the Association 
by endeavoring: 

1. To bring every girl into Association work. 

2. To raise the standard of the social life o 
the school by frequent simple gatherings and] 
by seeking to break down every barrier betwee; 

44 



the girls — thus holding up the social teachings 
of Jesus Christ. 

3. To spend part of each day in real prayer 
and faithful Bible study. 

4. To bring each girl into a close fellowship 
with Jesus Christ by means of Bible classes. 

5. To meet every Sunday afternoon for coun- 
sel and definite prayer and every Thursday 
night at 9:00 for prayer and discussion of work. 

6. To deepen the spiritual life of each girl, 
individually, by prayerful, personal work, by 
daily morning prayer meetings, and by weekly 
devotional meetings on Sunday night in the 
chapel. 

7. To arouse interest in missions by 
(a) Giving systematically to missions; 
(6) Mission-study classes; 

(c) A strong missionary meeting the first 
Sunday night in each month. 

8. To keep ourselves informed in regard to 
general Association work. 

9. To give written monthly reports to the 
Secretary, and to keep careful records of all 
work for the help of the new cabinet. 

10. To heartily co-operate individually and as 
a cabinet with the Student Council in securing 

nd maintaining a high standard of young wo- 
manhood in our school. 

11. To consider ourselves a personal workers 
band, endeavoring, with God's help, to bring to 
Christ every girl who has not already con- 
fessed Him, and to pray with this definite 
purpose. 

45 



WHY YOU iSHOULD JOIN 

THE YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN 

ASSOCIATION 

To you who are entering college this fall for 
the first time, let us say a few words about 
why you should join the-Y. W. C. A. 

In the first place you should begin your col- 
lege life by identifying yourself with the Chris- 
tian work of the school, for in this way you are 
brought under the best influences of the college 
course. 

A girl's character is formed before her col- 
lege course is ended. In the molding of your 
character, do you wish to leave out Christ? 
Be sure, then, that you join the Y. W. C. A. 
at the beginning of your course, and thereby 
seize the opportunity for the development of 
your spiritual life. 

You need spiritual inspiration as well as in- 
tellectual inspiration. 

You are given a wonderful opportunity for 
serving Christ by winning for Him the lives of 
those who have never known Him. 

In joining the Y. W. C. A. you are becoming 
a part of a world-wide student movement, which 
has for its members the strongest and most 
earnest students all over the world. 

"HINTS TO THE WISE." 

Come early and avoid the rush. 
Look out for Meredith Y. W. C. A. badges at 
the station. 

46 



Listen for the call of the night watchman, if 
you come on a night train. 

Register as soon as possible after you arrive. 

After you register, go to the adjoining room, 
over the door of which Information Bureau will 
be printed in large letters, for any information. 

Those wearing the Y. W. C. A. badges will 
gladly give you any assistance they can during 
the days of classification. 

V/riting materials and all such incidentals 
may be purchased at the "Y" store. 

Ask the old girls anything, any time. They 
ire always anxious to help you. 

Bring pillowcases, sheets, blankets, dresser 
md table covers with you. Your material for 
urtains had best be bought here, so you will 
lave no trouble in fitting your windows. But 
his is not all. Every college girl wants an 
,ttractive room. So bring your sofa cushions, 
lictures, mottoes, and all those little fixings 
rhich add so much to a room. Remember that 
'ou will be here for nine months, and you 
ertainly will enjoy life more in a cheerful 
com. 

Somebody is more homesick than you are. 
'ry to forget that you are lonely and do some- 
tiing for that other girl. 

The three bulletin boards— the official bulle- 
n board, near the library door, the Student 
overnment bulletin board, next to the mail 
3xes, and the Y. W. C. A. bulletin board, at 
le entrance to Faircloth Hall, are very im- 
3rtant. Watch them. 

47 



Remember to patronize the firms that adver- 
tise in our publications. "Turn about is fair 
play," 

The library is for quiet study. If you talk, it 
misses its purpose. 

At twilight when you feel the "blues" coming 
on, make a rush for the Y. W. C. A. room— No. 
2, first floor, East Building. The "blues" can't 
exist there at any time — day or night. 

When you want to cook, sign up for the "Y" 
kitchenette. 

CHURCHES 

There are Baptist, Methodist, Presbyterian, 
Episcopal, Catholic, Christian, Lutheran 
Churches in Raleigh. Every student is allowed 
to attend the church for which she has a 
choice. The first two Sundays after school 
opens the students are allowed to visit different 
churches of their denomination. After that 
they must fully decide what Church they prefer 
to attend regularly. 

THE STUDENT VOLUNTEER BAND 
DeLila Deaton — Leader 
The purpose of the Student Volunteers is 
seek those students who are interested in foreig 
mission work and to bring them together int| 
a forceful and co-operative band which meet 
twice a month for special study of foreign mil 
sions and the opportunities for service in foi 
eign lands. It helps to bring the membei 
of this band into closer relationship with Chri^ 

48 



and quickens their spiritual lives towards 
higher and nobler ambitions. The morning 
watch services prove a great factor towards 
the spiritual development of all who attend 



49 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

Officers for 1921-1922 

BEATRICE NYE President 

GoLDiE KAI.E Vice-President 

Beth Hunti^y Secretary 

Elizabeth Sawyer Treasurer 

Athletics fill a big place in our college life! 
When you arrive in the Fall adjust your aca- 
demic program to your athletic program, in- 
stead of Vice Versa! Be an all-round college 
girl. Go in for one or more of the major 
sports with plenty of "pep" and let it last 
throughout your college career. 

BASKET BALL 
Inter-class basket ball games determine the 
winner of the Championship. A loving cup is 
awarded the winning team and each playei 
receives a big letter "M". 

Schedules 

Finals— Seniors vs. Sophomores Nov. 1' 

Finals— Juniors vs. Freshmen Nov. 1 

Championship Game Nov. 2jS 

TENNIS 

As in basket ball each class has a team ai 
the two champions are awarded the "M". 

Schedule— ^DouMes 
Finals— Seniors vs. Sophomores Apr. 

50 



Finals — Juniors vs. Freshman Aj^r. 14 

Championship Game ^2^^. 17 

Schedule — Singles 

' Beginning Monday April the 24th the tourna- 
nent continues through the week and any girl 
r.rrespective of class, may compete. The cham- 
pion receives the "M". 

The Hiker's Club is composed of girls who 
ire interested in walking. The one student in 
sach class who walks the greatest number of 
niles over three hundred wins the "M". 

FIELD DAY 

This holiday, which comes the first week in 
lay, is divided between the regular gymnastic 
xhibition, the parade and May pole drills. 
Hrls! Every one is expected to take part and 
lake the day our big Athletic Show. There 
re two honors awarded for each of the two 
satures rendered by the different classes. The 
rst honor, a blue ribbon, and the second honor, 

red ribbon, bear the name of class and fea- 
ire. 

During the year 1921-22 we are hoping to 

rrange games between Societies and in bas- 

9t ball; a Varsity team will be selected which 

capable of representing Meredith against 

:her Colleges. 

THE LITERARY SOCIETIES 
Merediths two literary socities, the Philare- 

Meredith CBUege Library 
Raleigh, N. C 



tian and Astrotekton, work together in friendly 
rivalry throughout the year. Their purpose is 
to help students combine their academic train- 
ing in a practical manner with their social 
life, and to promote a useful experience in 
outside cultural interests. 

These societies have separate halls, in which 
they meet on every Saturday night to enjoy 
clever programs or more informal fun. In 
order to stimulate the spirit of loyalty and de- 
velop initiative among students hoth societies 
present plays every session. During the past 
year, a play, "The Littlest Rebel," was presen- 
ted by the Philaretian Society and an operetta, 
"The American Girl" by the Astrotekton So- 
ciety. 

With their many good times, these societies 
constitute one of the most enjoyable featuresj 
of college life at Meredith. 

OFFICERS OF THE PHILARETIAN 
LITERARY SOCIETY 

LiLLA Earle Dowell Preside- 

Claudiline Sykes Vice-Presideri 

Barre Peitchett Secretari 

Thomasine Underwood.- Treasurer 

OFFICERS OF THE ASTROTEKTON 
LITERARY SOCIETY 

Alethia Pexton Presiden 

Mary Lely Blalock Yice-Presiden 

Ebma Moore Secretar, 

Lois Kendrick Treasure 

52 j 



STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

The Twig is quite a new publication at 
kleredith. It is the weekly newspaper of the 
tucients, published by the Philaretian and 
istrotekton Literary Societies. It embraces 
ill phases of college life and activi- 
ies from the inter-class basket ball and tennis 
:ames to account of the Student Government 
leetings. 

In comparison with The Acorn it is just a 
aby. For several years we have felt the need 
f and wanted such a paper, but it was only in 
tie spring of 1921, that it was founded through 
ae joint efforts of the 1920-21 Editors-in-Chief 
f the Acorn and Annual Staff. A few copies 
-ere published during the closing weeks of the 
921 session. These samples delighted every- 
ody, and made them eager for more. Next 
ear we are going to strive with our utmost 
ower to make The Twig the equal of any 
outhern College newspaper. But the editors 
mnot do this alone, strive as they might. 
he Twig and its future depends on you girls, 
.d and new. You simply must back it up, 
id give it your heartiest and most loyal sup- 
-)Tt and co-operation. When we call on you 

help us, do not fail us. It is not primarily 

literary publication as is The Acorn. We 
ant to spice the serious with the comic. We 
ant lots of real funny, original jokes, and we 
re depending on you to furnish them. 

53 



To the new girls, The Twig extends a hearty 
welcome. We know tliat you are going to like 
it just fine, and take great interest in it, and 
help us to make it a very vital part of our 
college life. 

The following girls compose The Twig staff: 

Katherine Beown Editor-in-Chief 

Elizabeth Kendbick Business Manager 

Ann Eliza Brewer Business Manager 

Evelyn Baily .Assistant Business Manager 

Clara Mae Jbssup. ) j^^^^^ Editors 

Ruth Freeman \ 

Geraldine Gower. ) ^ , „,.^ 

. TT TTT >• Sophomore Editors 

Annie Hope Ward, f 

The Acorn is the magazine published month- 
ly hy the two literary societies. Its aim is to 
give expression to the literary ability of our 
school, instead of presenting what is typical 
of life among the students. While things be 
side literary work are given room, necessarily 
scholarship holds first place. We sincerely re- 
quest the co-operation of every girl, both old 
and new, in making The Acorn of 1921-22 the 
best ever. 

The Acorn staff is: 

Eiditor-in-'Chief Bertha Moore 

Assistant Editor-in-Chief Fannie Pau\ 

Grace Huff '2S 

_, , Lois Smith '2^ 

Associate Editors / .^ ,^ ^ ,^ , 

Lavita McLean 2\ 



Susie Herring 
54 



'21 



Business Manager Beulah Rowland 

Assistant Business Managee, . .Dai^Tiwe Oivens 

The Oak Leaves is the college annual, pub- 
lished by the Phllaretian and Astrotekton 
Literary Societies. Unlike the Acorn, it is not 
essentially of a literary nature, but its purpose 
is to represent every phase of college life, in- 
cluding all the classes, all college and student 
organizations and clubs, thus aiming to portray 
our college life as it really is. Although each 
of these pha£:es has its places, the Senior Class 
is correctly accorded the foremost place. Of 
course every girl will want an annual and it 
will be received by every student who pays the 
sum designated for the annual in the yearly 
budget. Anyone else desiring one should make 
the proper arrangement with the Business 
Manager. 

The following girls form the Annual Staff: 

Kathleen Matthews Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Livermon Associate Editor 

:\Iadge Hedrick Business Manager 

Evelyn Sentelle. .Assistant Business Manager 
Margaret Duncan 



}■ 



RiTiY Spainhou^ ^^^^^^^' ^^^^^^'« 

Elizabeth Kimsey ) 

Francis Cherry j Sophomore Editors 

Mary Tillery Ai't Editor 

BUDGET 

The second Monday in October will be pay- 



55 



day. All dues for all organizations must be 
paid that day. They are as follows: 

Student Government $1-25 

Y. W. C. A 1-^^ 

Society ^-^^ 

Annual ^-^^ 

Athletic Association 50 

*Total $10.50 

*Society initiation fee for new girls $1.00. 

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB 

Officers for 1921-1922 

Ann Eliza Brewer President 

Fannie Paul Secretary 

The object of The International Relations 
Club is the scientific study of the current in 
ternational problems that confront mankind. 
Study is conducted in a thoroughly non^par 
tisan spirit and devoid of any propagandist aim. 
Although it is particularly helpful to the stu 
dents majoring in History, and has as its 
advisors the History Professor, Mr. S. J. Riley, 
together with Misses Beatrice M. Teague and 
Mary S. Steel, this club is not confined to the 
students in this department, but all who are 
actively interested in world problems of today 
and who meet the academic requirements an 
eligible for membership. 



56 



GLEE CLUB 

Officers 1921-1922 

Beulas Rowla^^d President 

B.SSX. L^ POO.. y.oe-p:::;:::: 

Helet. Holmes Secretary-Treasurer 

Beatrice Nye Business Manager 

The Glee Club, one of the most important 
and interesting organizations in college is un- 
der the capable direction of Dr. Dingley BroTvn 
Director of Music. It is composed of girls 
from all classes, but membership requirements 
mdude academic efficiency as well as Musical 

Although a young organization its success 
las been established in the past two years, its 
irst two of existence, and we are planning for 
nore extensive tours in the future 



57 



Hudson - Belk Co- 

''Leading Department Store'' 

Fayetteville-Martin-Wilmingtoii Streets 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

C4TERS TO ALL 

Meredith College Students 

New Students Welcome 



Q 



You will find this a convenient 
and pleasant place to shop. We 
are glad to cash your checks. 



30 Belk Stores 30 



. STUDENTS' HAND-BOOK 



OF 



MEREDITH COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 
1920-1921 




EDITOR 

Christine Judd 

business manager 
Mary Sue Hunt 



RALEIGH 

Edwaeds & BFvOUGHTO>r Printing Co. 

1920 



ALMA MATER 

We salute thee, Alma Mater, we salute the 

with a song. 
At thy feet our loyal hearts, their tribute lay 
We had waited for thy coming, in the darkness | 

waited long, I 

Ere the morning star proclaimed thy natal day.j 

f 
Thou hast come through tribulation, and thy[ 

robe is clean and white, I 

Thou art fairer than the summer in its bloom, [' 
Thou art born unto a kingdom, and thy crowni 

is all of light; i 

Thou Shalt smile away the shadow and thei 

gloom. [ 

In thy paths the fields shall blossom and the| 
desert shall rejoice, || 

In the wilderness a living, fountain spring. 

For the blind shall see thy beauty, and the 
deaf shall hear thy voice. 

And the silent tongues their high hozannas 
sing. 

Where the rhododendron blushes on the burl: 
mountain's breast, i 

In the midland where the wild deer love toj 
roam; 

Where the water-lily slumbers while the cypress 
guards its rest, 

Lo, thy sunny land of prom-ise and thy home.' 

Where the sons of Carolina taught a Nation toj 
be free, , 

And her daughters taught their brothers to bei 
brave ; 

O'er the land of peaceful plenty, from the high 
lands to the sea. 

May thy banner. Alma Mater, ever wave. 

R. T. Vann. 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Alma Mater 2 

A Day's Program 4 

Social Calendar 5 

Y. W. C. A. Invitation 6 

Student Government Department 7 

Officers, House Presidents, etc 8 

Constitution 10 

By-lav/s 15 

College Regulations 17 

Privileges 22 

Things You Ought to Know 25 

"Don'ts" 26 

Fire Department 27 

Supplement to Hand-Book 29 

Other Organizations 33 

To the Freshmen 34 

Y. W. C. A 35 

Motto and Greeting 35 

Work of Y. W. C. A 36 

Cabinet Policy 41 

"Hints to the Wise" 44 

Churches 46 

Athletic Association 47 

Literary Societies 49 

Student Publications 50 

Budget 51 

International Relations Club 52 

Glee Club 53 

Dramatic Club 53 

3 



■ A DAY'S PROGRAM 

A. M. 

Rising bell 6:45 

First breakfast bell 7:30 

Breakfast 7 : 45 

Chapel 8:35 

First class 9:00 

Second class 10:00 

Third class 11:00 

Fourth class 12 : 00 

p. M. 

Lunch 1:00 

Fifth class 1:30 

Laboratory 2:30 

First dinner bell 5:45 

Dinner 6:00 

Study hour 7:45 

Visiting bell 10:00 

Room bell 10:15 

Light bell 10 : 30 



SOCIAL CALENDAR 
Fall: 
For new girls especially — 

S. G. and Y. W, C. A. reception. 

"Y" room entertainments. 

Society reception and entertainments. 
Church receptions. 
Stato Fair holidays. 
Wake Forest Society Day. 
State College receptions. 
Stunt night. 

Inter-class basket-ball games. 
Society Day. 
Y. W. C. A. Christmas party. 

Spring : 
Founders' Day. 

Student Government Association reception. 
Wake Forest anniversary. 
Y. W. C. A. reception. 
Class entertainments. 
Tennis tournaments. 
Field Day. 



You are cordially invited to attend 

the 

Informal Reception 

Given to New Students 

by the 

Student Government 

and 

Young Women's Christian Associations 

at 

eight o'clock P. M. 

Saturday, September eleventh. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 
DEPARTMENT 



OFFICERS 

President Louise Elizabeth Fleming 

Vice-President Mary H. Tillery 

Secretary Beth Carroll 

Treasurer Carolyn Morton Mercer 

HOUSE PRESIDENTS 

Main Building — Edna Earle Hinton, President; 
Louise Powell, Sub-President. 

Faircloth — Inez Boyd, President; Mary Floyd, 
Sub-President. 

East Building — ^Alma Clay, President; Marga- 
ret Duncan, Sub-President. 

Fire Chief — Eunice Homewood. 

Clieer Leader — Grace Mooney. 

COMMITTEES 
Ideals — Mary Lee Caldwell, Chairman; Anne 

Eliza Brewer, Elizabeth Knight, Ruth 

Freeman. 
Social — Mattie Macon Norman, Chairman; 

Retta Vann Hart, Eupha Mackenzie, Julia 

Moore. 
Buildings and Grounds — Bertha Moore, Chair- 
man; Doris Tillery, Jocelyn Cox, Fannie 

Paul. 
Music — Mary Creech Williams, assistant cheei 

leader, Chairman; Margaret Pope, Beatrice 

Nye, Winona Poole. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT 

Student Government means all the Meredith 
girls, with a real Meredith sense of honor, 
v/orking together to make Meredith the best 
college 'possible. 

The spirit of the Student Association is the 
real college spirit, and a loyal student spirit 
means not only a co-operating student organi- 
zation, but clean athletics, an enthusiastic 
Y. W. C. A., and a working literary society. 
The success of any organization in college de- 
pends on the attitude of the girls toward the 
Student Government Association. We must 
work together for the common good of all be- 
fore we can work in groups in smaller organi- 
zations. 

Every Individual girl is responsible for the 
carrying out of the laws of the Student Gov- 
ernment. These laws are made by the students 
themselves, and approved by the faculty. Dis- 
regard of these laws means that a girl is not 
a loyal member of the college community and 
is not worthy of the privileges of the same. 
The Student Government encourages loyalty to 
all organizations, promptness in all duties, and 
a spirit of love and friendship among the girls. 



CONSTITUTION 

ARTICLE I 

NAME 

This Association shall he called the Student 

GOVEENMENT ASSOCIATION OF MeEEDITH COLLEGE. 

ARTICLE II 

OBJECT 

The object of this Association shall be the 
government of the student body. 

ARTICLE III 

MEMBEESHIP 

(a) All students who are seventeen years of 
age shall, upon registration at Meredith, be- 
come members of the Student Government As- 
sociation. 

(&) All students who are not seventeen years 
of age shall, upon registration at Meredith, be- 
come associate members of the Student Gov- 
ernment Association. 

ARTICLE IV 

OFFICEES THEIE ELECTION AND DUTIES 

Section 1. The officers of the Association shall 
consist of a President, a Vice-President, a Sec- 
retary, and a Treasurer. 
10 



Sec. 2 (a) The President shall he chosen 
from the incoming Senior class. 

(&) The officers and House Presidents shall 
he elected hy ballot at the annual meeting held 
the first Monday in March. 

(c) The officers shall enter upon their duties 
four weeks from date of election. 

Sec. 3 (a) It shall be the duty of the Presi- 
dent to preside over all meetings of the Asso- 
ciation and of the Executive Committee, to 
appoint any call meetings she may consider 
necessary, and to appoint all committees not 
otherwise provided for in these articles. 

(&) The duties of the Vice-President shall be 
the same as those of the President, should the 
President at any time be unable to perform her 
duties. 

(c) It shall be the duty of the Secretary to 
record the proceedings of all meetings of the 
Association and of the Executive Committee, 
to post all official notices, to submit to the Dean 
the lists of members and associate members, 
officers, committees, and other bodies appointed 
by the Association. 

id) It shall be the duty of the Treasurer to 
keep a strict and permanent account of all 
receipts and expenditures, to collect fines, to 
present a report at the annual meeting of the 
Association, and to perform other duties that 
may devolve upon her as Treasurer of the 
Association. 

11 



ARTICLE V 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 

Section 1. The Executive Committee shall 
consist of the officers of the Association and 
the House Presidents. 

Sec. 2 (a) It shall be the duty of the Exec- 
utive Committee to meet every six weeks, to 
enforce the rules of the Association, and to con- 
sider business of that body. 

(&) It shall be the duty of the Executive 
Committee to divide the corridors into dis- 
tricts, and to determine the tenure of office of 
the proctors. 

(c) The Executive Committee may, at its dis- 
cretion, summon before it and reprimand any 
member or members of the Association. The 
committee shall have the right to withdraw 
privileges and to impose penalties. These, how- 
ever, shall be reported to the Advisory Com- 
mittee before being put into effect. The pen- 
alties of public reprimand, demerits, suspension 
and expulsion shall be subject to the approval 
of the faculty or a committee representing the 
faculty. 

(d) It shall be the duty of the Executive 
Committee to Consider proposed regulations 
and to refer such as are approved to the Aca- 
demic Council for their approval or disapproval. 
The Academic Council agrees to pass no regula- 
tions except such as have been passed by the 
Executive Committee. 

Sec. 3. (a) The Advisory Committee shall 
12 



consist of the Dean and two members of the 
faculty. 

(&) The duties of the Advisory Committee 
shall be to receive reports from the Executive 
Committee and to confer with that committee 
whenever occasion may demand. 

Sec. 4. The Nominating Committee shall be 
composed of the presidents of the various col- 
lege organizations; that is, of the Student Gov- 
ernment Association, of the Y. W. C. A., and 
of the two Societies. The president of the Stu- 
dent Government Association shall act as 
chairman. 

ARTICLE VI 

MEETINGS 

Section 1. (a) A meeting shall be held as 
soon as possible after the beginning of the 
college year, at which time the Constitution, 
By-Laws, and Regulations shall be read and 
explained. 

(6) A meeting shall be held the first Monday 
in March for the election of officers. 

(c) A meeting of the Association shall be 
called once each month for reports from the 
Executive Committee and discussion by the 
members. 

Sec. 2. Meetings of the Association may be 
called at any time by the President on her own 
motion, and must be called by her on the 
written request of ten members. The object of 
these special meetings shall be stated in writing 
when the request is made. 
13 



ARTICLE VII 

JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT 

Section 1. The judicial power of the Associa- 
tion shall be vested in — 

(a) The Association, which shall constitute 
a higher court, and which shall be a Court of 
Appeal from the decisions of the Executive 
Committee. 

(&) The Executive Committee, which shall 
constitute the lower court, and from which 
alone an appeal to the whole Association may 
be made. 

ARTICLE VIII 

QUORUM 

Section 1. (a) One-third of the members of 
the Association shall constitute a quorum for 
the transaction of ordinary business. 

(&) Two-thirds of the members of the Asso- 
ciation shall constitute a quorum for the annual 
meeting in March, for any meeting in which 
an amendment or change in the Constitution 
is voted on, and when the Association is acting 
in its judicial capacity. 

ARTICLE IX 

AMENDMENTS 

Section 1. An amendment may be proposed 
by the faculty, by the Student Executive Com- 
mittee, or by any fifteen members of the As- 
sociation. The proposed amendment shall be 
posted at least one week before it is presented 
to the Association, and shall be approved by 
the faculty of the college before its adoption, r 
14 



BY-LAV/'S 

I. 

The rules contained in Roberts' Rules of 
Order shall govern the Association in all busi- 
ness meetings. 

IT. 

(a) The annual dues of the Association shall 
be one dollar. 

(6) A fine of ten cents shall be imposed 
upon any member of the Association who is 
absent from a meeting without an excuse ac- 
ceptable to the Executive Committee. 

III. 

(a) Nominations for oScers shall be posted 
at least three days before election. 

(6) A plurality of votes cast shall elect all 
omcers of the Association. 

IV. 

(a) Each college dormitory shall be divided 
into districts, each of which shall have a proc- 
tor. There shall be a House President for each 
house and a sub-House President. 

(6) The House President, together v/ith the 
proctors of the house, shall form a House Coun- 
cil, whose duties shall be to enforce all rules 
of the Association pertaining to the govern- 
ment of the house. 

15 



(c) Each House President shall require every 
student in her house within two v/eeks after 
the opening of the Fall semester to sign the 
following statement: "I have read the Consti- 
tution, By-Laws, and Regulations of the Stu- 
dent Government Association. I realize that I 
am on my honor to keep the rules of the 
Association, and I pledge myself to observe 
the same and to try to he a consistent member." 
When any associate member shall have attained 
the age of seventeen years, she shall become 
a regular member of the Association, upon no- 
tifying her House President. 

(cl) There shall be regular meetings of the 
House Council every six weeks. 

(e) Proctors will not give permissions. 

(/) The sub-House President shall act in the 
absence of the House President and assist her 
as occasion demands. 

STUDENT COUNCIL 

In addition to the Student Government Ex- 
ecutive Committee, there has been organized 
a Student Council, composed of the Student 
Government Executive Committee, the Presi- 
dents of the major student organizations, the 
editors-in-chief of the student publications, and 
the class representatives. The purpose of this 
board is to study and solve the problems of 
the college community. 



16 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 

1. The rising bell will ring at 6:45 a. m.; the 
retiring bell at 10:30 p. m. At the ringing of 
the retiring bell all lights will be extinguished, 
students will retire and the house be quiet 
until the rising bell. No extra time will be 
allowed after 10:30. 

2. The dining room doors shall be closed five 
minutes after the last bell rings. 

3. Students may not be off the campus when 
due for any college duty: when visiting, how- 
ever, students may leave the college Saturday 
when work is finished and must be at the col- 
lege for work Monday morning. 

4. Students will not leave the college grounds 
without registering except for walking or work- 
ing at the State or Raney Library. 

5. Students will register in the Student 
Advisor's office when exercising any special 
privilege off the campus, such as attending re- 
ceptions, ball games, etc. 

6. No visits out of the city will be made 
without a written permission from parent or 
guardian stating to whom the visit is to be 
made. This must be mailed directly to the 
President or the Dean; otherwise, it v/ill not 
be considered. 

7. Students may not be accompanied to or 
from the station or receptions by young men. 

17 



8. No one may visit in town over night during 
Fair holidays, except with members of the im- 
mediate family. 

9. During the State Fair, Wednesday and 
Thursday are given as holidays. All students 
who attend the Fair, except Seniors and Juniors, 
are chaperoned either by some friend approved 
by the Dean, or by members of the faculty. 

10. Students will not visit restaurants, hotels, 
railroad stations, or places of amusement with- 
out permission and a chaperon. 

11. No student will entertain guests in her 
room. All visitors v/ill be entertained in the 
parlors. No young lady will go to the parlors 
to meet friends without permission from the 
Student Advisor except during calling hours. 

12. Because of the lack of guest chambers, 
students may not entertain their friends over- 
night at the college. 

13. Students may not attend social affairs or 
those merely for entertainment on school days. 
Requests to attend those of educational value 
will be referred to the Student Advisor. 

14. Students may not sit v/ith young men in 
chapel at any function under the auspices of 
the college, but may do so when it is under 
the auspices of a student organization. 

15. Students may not ride on street cars ex- 
cept when going to or from the station or 
church, and when calling with the permission 
of the Dean. 

18 



16. All students are reauired to attend Sunday 
chool and church 85 per cent of the time on 
unday mornings. When taking cuts, they 
lay attend church services elsewhere than at 
leir own church, hut must not answer to roll- 
all. When in the Infirmary students will he 
xcused. 

17. Students should he in their places in 
hapel when the three-minute bell stops ringing, 
^alking is forbidden after the organist begins 
ilaying. No books will be taken into chapel. 

18. Each unexcused absence or tardiness from 
ny college duty, such as registering for shop- 
(ing or for any special privilege, answering 
Sunday School roll-call, etc., will count as one 
lelinquent, except absence from chapel will 
;ount as two. % 

Any student receiving nine delinquencies dur- 
ng any quarter will he debarred from exercising 
.he privileges of the Student Government As- 
sociation for four weeks. Students receiving 
line during the last quarter will lose their 
privileges for the two weeks before commence- 
aient. 

19. Students will report, within three days, 
to the Student Advisor to be excused for any 
absence or tardiness; otherwise, these will go 
on the college record as unexcused delinquen- 
cies. 

20. "Call downs" will be given for going over 
an official study sign. Three of these makes a 

19 



girl subject to a reprimand from the Student 
Committee. 

21. Quiet will he preserved during the fol 
lowing hours: 

(a) On Sunday during Silent Hour, that is, 
from 2 p. m. to 4:30 p. m. 

(&) On Monday from 10:00 a. m. to 1:00 
p. m., and from 1:30 p. m. to 2:30 p. m., and 
from 7:45 p. m. to 10:00 p. m.; on Tuesday, 
Wednesday, Thursday and Friday from 8:35 
a. m. to 1:00 p. m., and from 1:30 p. m. to 
2:30 p. m., and from 7:45 p. m. to 10:00 p. m.; 
on Saturday from 8:35 a. m. to 1:00 p. m., and 
from 1:30 p. m. to 2:30 p. m. 

22. Under no circumstances will visiting dur- 
ing the Sunday Silent Hour be allowed, unless 
permission has been obtained from the House 
President before 2 o'clock. 

23. Permission to send telegrams or long- 
distance messages may be obtained from the 
Student Advisor during her office hours, or 
from the Secretary to the President. Such 
messages must be paid for in advance. 

24. No student may send any matter to the 
local press for publication without the permis- 
sion of the Student Advisor; and all posters, 
invitations, or other printed matter must be 
approved by her. 

25. Chafing-dishes with alcohol burners may 
not be used in the college. A charge of five 
cents an hour will be made for the use of 
electric plates. 

20 



26. Dancing and card-playing will not be 
)ermitted. In regard to these, there is a dif- 
erence of opinion, hut all will agree that it is 
safe to replace them hy other recreations. 

27. Sororities of whatever name or kind, 
vhetJier regular or irregular, affiliating with 
iimilar organizations elsewhere or unaffiliating, 
ire alisolutely prohibited. The punishment for 
his offense will be expulsion, demerits, or sus- 
pension, or a combination of any of these at 
he discretion of the Academic Council and 
student Executive Committee. 

28. Students will not carry on a conversation 
A^ith young men on the campus, at the libraries, 
it the drug stores, or on the street. 

29. Any student found communicating by 
word or sign, beyond simple recognition, from 
my part of the building or grounds, or else- 
ivhere, or making clandestine engagements with 
my man, will be reprimanded, demerited, sus- 
pended, or expelled, at the discretion of the 
Student Executive Committee and the Faculty. 

30. Hazing is absolutely forbidden. Any in- 
terference by one class with another class, or 
by the members of one class with the members 
Df another, is included in the term "hazing." 

31. The punishment for cheating on examina- 
tion, or elsewhere, will be expulsion, withdrawal 
of credits, or demerits, or a combination of the 
last two, at the discretion of the Academic 
Council and Student Executive Committee. 

21 



PRIVILEGES 

[In order to exercise the privileges of the Stu- 
dent Government Association each student's 
parent or guardian must have notified the Dean 
of his permission for his daughter to exercise 
these privileges. This permission must he 
mailed directly to the President or Dean of 
the College.] 

Those having the necessary permissions may 
exercise the following privileges: 

1. May shop in groups of two on Monday 
afternoon. 

2. May receive visits from friends on Monday 
afternoons from 3:30 to 5:30 or on Saturday 
evenings after Society, provided they go tc 
Society. 

3. May dine with friends in town any twc 
Saturday evenings during a semester; may dint 
down town with young men with a chaperor 
approved by the Dean one evening during 
semester. 

4. May make calls in town any one afternoor 
in week, provided the Dean is notified hefor( 
such calls are made. 

5. May make week-end visits in the homes o: 
friends four times a year and in the homes o: 
near relatives once a month. ("Near relatives' 
will he interpreted to mean grandparents 
brothers, or sisters.) 

6. When visiting in the city, students ma3 
appear on the streets or in public gatherings 

22 



Y/ittL young men if chaperons have been ap- 
proved by the Student Advisor. The hostess 
is considered an approved chaperon. 

7. May take part in studio parties twice a 
semester. 

8. During the first six weeks in the fall 
Freshmen must he accompanied by old girls 
when w^alking off the campus or shopping. 

9. With the permission of the House Presi- 
dent, girls may spend the night Vv^ith friends 
in the same or other buildings. Saturday and 
Sunday nights permission is unnecessary. 

10. With the permission of the Student Ad- 
visor students may go driving on Monday and 
Saturday afternoons with young men, provided 
a chaperon approved by the Dean has been 
secured. 

11. Students may walk from 4:30 to 5:30 
Sunday afternoon in the northern and eastern 
part of town. 

12. Students may attend moving picture shows 
one Monday a month with faculty or approved 
student chaperon. No chaperon should have 
more than six girls in her party. 

13. Students may spend Sundays in tov/n and 
let them count as week-ends. 

SOPHOMORE PRIVILEGES 

Besides the above privileges the Sophomores 
have the following: 

1. The class may have one evening off during 
23 



the session, provided no member of the class is 
guilty of hazing in any manner whatever. 

2. Members of class may go to church with a 
chaperon three Sunday nights during a seme- 
ster. 

JUNIOR PRIVILEGES 

In addition the Juniors have the following 
special privileges: 

1. Approved Juniors may chaperon wherever 
student chaperonage is permissible. 

2. Members of the class may go to dentist 
and occulist in groups of two. 

3. May attend church Sunday night in groups 
of three without a chaperon. 

4. May receive callers any one afternoon or 
any one evening except Sunday. 

5. May shop any two afternoons after school. 

SENIOR PRIVILEGES 

In addition the Seniors have the following 
special privileges: 

1. May walk and shop alone. 

2. May receive callers any two afternoons or 
any two evenings in week except Sunday, or 
with the permission of the Dean may spend 
the afternoon or evening away from the col- 
lege. 

3. May be excused from answering to Sunday 
School roll-call. 

4. May go to ball games, matinees, and pic- 
tures in groups of three without a chaperon. 

24 



5, May occasionally spend a Sunday in town. 

6, May have one extra week-end during the 
last six weeks. 

7, May go to church Sunday evenings in 
groups of three unchaperoned. 

THINGS YOU OUGHT TO KNOW 

1. Students are under the college regulations 
from the time they reach the college until they 
take the train to leave Raleigh, or until they 
have received permission from the Dean to visit 
in the city at Christmas vacation or at the 
close of the session. 

2. Students may not walk in the business 
sections of the city, on Fayetteville and Hills- 
horo streets, in the Capitol Square, in or near 
the vicinity of the railroad shops, or station 
unless they have registered to go shopping. 

.3. No medicines are to be administered ex- 
cept by the advice and prescription of the phy- 
sician, as much harm results from the promis- 
cuous taking of medicine without competent 
advice. 

4. Students will be held responsible and will 
pay for loss, breakage, and damage in which 
they are instrumental. All such injuries should 
be promptly reported to the Housekeeper. No 
furniture may be moved from any place with- 
out her permission. 

5. Sunday School roll will not be taken on 
Easter Sunday. 

25 



6. Pianos may not be used on Sunday morn- 
ings. 

7. No student may, without permission from 
the Housekeeper, have colored women come to 
her room or to the dormitory corridors, as there 
is danger of loss of money or clothes. 

8. White middy blouses and dark skirts, or 
any kind of washable middy suits may not be 
worn to Sunday dinner, on the streets at any 
time, or elsewhere after 4:30 p. m., except in 
the dormitory halls. Regulation serge middy 
suits may be worn except on Fayetteville Street, 
in the parlors, and on Sunday after 1:00 p. m., 
or on occasions when they would be inappro- 
priate. 

9. Order of classification. First, go to the 
President's office and register. After doing 
this, go across the hall to the Bursar's office 
and pay your matriculation fee of ten dollars. 
It is very necessary that you bring your ma- 
triculation fee with you, because until you 
have paid it you cannot be classified in the 
Dean's office. In return for this the Bursar 
will give you a receipt, which you must carry 
with you to the Dean's office, where you will 
be classified. 

DON'TS 

1. Don't get discouraged the first few weeks 
of your college year. 

2. Don't forget that you are a Meredith girl 
and people judge Meredith by you. 

26 



3. Don't forget and disturb your neighbor by- 
calling from one building to the other. 

4. Don't forget that your room is near the 
street, and be careful to draw your shades when 
you light your room at night. 

5. Don't give outsiders a bad impression of 
Meredith by sitting in the windows. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

There shall be a Fire Department main- 
tained in college under the direction of the 
Student Government Association. 

Each student is required to attend all drills. 
Regulations are posted in all rooms. 

Section 1. Officers — Their election and du- 
ties: 

(1) There shall be a Fire Chief chosen from 
the Senior class and elected by the student 
body. 

(2) There shall be a Captain in each build- 
ing elected by the Student Executive Commit- 
tee. 

(3) There shall be as many First and Sec- 
ond Lieutenants in each building as deemed 
necessary by the Student Government Com- 
mittee and Fire Chief. 

Section 2. (1) The duties of the Fire Chief 
shall be: 

a. To meet with the Student Executive Com- 
mittee the opening week of the college year 
and choose captains and lieutenants. 
27 



&. To make reports of fire drills and mis- 
demeanors. 

c. To instruct Captains and Lieutenants. 

d. To call fire drills. 

(2) The duties of the Captains shall be to 
notify the Fire Chief in case of fire and to 
preserve order during fire drill. They shall 
also report to the Fire Chief names of ab- 
sentees and any additions in their divisions. 

(3) The duties of First Lieutenants shall be: 
a. To receive orders from Captains as to 

which exit to take and to lead the line out of 
the building. 

&. To see that absolute quiet is observed 
during fire drill. 

c. To report to the Captain names of those 
absent in their divisions. 

(4) The duties of Second Lieutenants shall 
be: To see that each room is vacant, doors 
open, windows and transoms closed, and to 
report to Captains any violation of rules. 



28 



SUPPLEMENT 

TO THE 

HAND-BOOK 

Academic Regulations not Printed 
IN THE Catalogue 

1. Students may be excused for absence from 
class for illness In the infirmary or on a doc- 
tor's written statement. They may also be 
excused by the Dean for reasons deemed by 
her sufficient. In addition, students may be 
absent without excuse for not more than one 
day a semester. However, they may not be 
away from the college without excuse and 
so miss classes except for visits home. 

2. Unexcused absence will entail lowering of 
grade. The semester grade will be lowered in 
the Dean's office for each unexcused absence 
in a one-hour subject five points; in a two- 
hour subject three points; in a three-hour sub- 
ject two and a half points; in a four-hour sub- 
ject two points. 

Students will arrange with their instructors 
about making up work missed. 

4. Students will receive zeros for cutting the 
last recitation in subjects before a holiday, and 
the first after a holiday. 

5. Students may not miss class work or pri- 
vate lessons, or change them from one day to 

29 



another, to make visits. See privilege 5 of the 
Hand-Book. 

6. A student may not drop a subject or 
change her course without permission from the 
Dean. 

7. Students are required to take examina- 
tions in all subjects pursued during a semester. 

8. No one will be excused from any college 
duty on account of illness unless she is the 
patient of the physician or nurse. 

9. Students may not take part in plays or 
other entertainments without the permission 
of the Dean. Ordinarily, permission will not 
be given to those who are not making grade 
or who have more than sixteen hours of work 
per week. 

REGULATIONS FOR TUTORING 

1. Students may tutor only with tutors who 
have been approved by the Dean and the- head 
of the department. 

2. The number of hours which a tutor may 
have will be determined by the Dean. (Ordi- 
narily, three hours of tutoring will count as 
one academic hour.) 

3. Absences from tutoring lessons and unpre- 
pared will be reported and counted as if from 
regular class. 

4. The price for tutoring lessons will be, 
under ordinary circumstances, twenty-five cents 
an hour for individual work. If there are 

30 



more than one in a course, the Dean and the 
tutor will determine the price. 

MUSIC PRACTICE 

1. Under all circumstances proctors will mark 
a student absent if she does not practice during 
the time assigned her. 

2. Under no circumstances do proctors ex- 
cuse students; therefore, do not make such re- 
quests of them. Make these requests of the 
Head Proctor. 

3. Under all ordinary conditions students will 
practice at their regular time. If any one 
wishes to substitute some other hour, the per- 
mission of the Head Proctor must be obtained 
before the change is made; otherwise, the ab- 
sence will not l)e excused. 

4. When students are given the privilege of 
making up practice, it must be made up and 
so reported within three days from the time 
it was missed. Otherwise, it will go on the 
college record as unexcused. 

5. All students taking as much as two hours 
of practice are required to attend the student 
recitals on Thursday afternoons; any other 
music student not having the equivalent of 
fifteen hours of work a week will be required 
to attend. An unexcused absence from re- 
cital will count as an absence from regular 
practice. 

31 



6. Every absence or tardiness should be re- 
ported to the Head Proctor at once. Unless 
so reported, after three days such delinquency 
will go on the college record as unexcused. 

7. Three unexcused absences from practice 
during any quarter causes loss of privileges for 
a month for those practicing from one to two 
hours a day. 

Four unexcused absences from practice during 
any quarter causes loss of privileges for a 
month for those practicing three or more hours 
a day. 

In all cases two tardies count as one absence; 
leaving practice rooms without permission for 
visiting or other purposes will count as a tardy. 



32 



OTHER ORGANIZATIONS 



TO THE FRESHMEN 

We welcome you to Meredith, 

Dear class of Twenty-four. 
We know that you will like our school, 

Others have liked it before. 

You may count on every girl 

To do her best for you. 
Especially may you count on us, 

The class of Twenty-two. 

We know we'll love you every one — 
Make friends with you galore. 

And you'll make Meredith proud of you. 
Here's to Twenty-four! 

JUNIOES. 



34 



YOUNG WOMEN'S 
HRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



MOTTO 

''Not by might nor hy voioer, J)ut by 
My Spirit, saith the Lord of Hosts" 



GREETING 

Through these pages we extend a 
most hearty welcome, in the name of 
the One for whose glory our Associa- 
tion is founded, to all students entering 
Meredith this fall. It is the earnest 
prayer of the committee that the asso- 
ciational work not only may he a 
blessing to you, hut also that you may 
be a blessing to the Association. 



35 



WORK OF YOUNG WOMEN'S 
CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

OFFICERS 

Jeannette Biggs President. 

Ruth Couch Vice-President 

Mattie Macon Norman Secretary 

Alethia Felton Treasurer 

LiDiE Penton Undergraduate Secretary 

depaetments and committees 

I. MemhersMp — Ruth Coucpi. 

(a) Fall Campaign Committee. ' 

(&) New Girls Committee. 1 

II. Finance — Alethia Felton. I 

(a) Dues. I 

(&) Pledges. j 

III. Puhlicity — Cheistine Judd. i 
(a) Bulletin Board — Christine Judd. I 
(&) Library and Publication — Beth Cae-j 

EOLL. I 

(c) Poster — Maey Tilleey. ; 

id) Editor — Baeee Pritchett. ' 

IV. Religious Work — ^Ann Eliza Brewer. : 

(a) Meetings. \ 

1. Sunday night — ^Ann Eliza Brewer. \ 

2. Music — Beatrice Nye. : 

3. Prayer meetng — Ruth Liverman. i 
(&) Bible Study. 

1. Group. 

2. Individual. 

36 



'. Social WlLMA DUEHAM, 

(a) Hospitality — Annabel Bridger. 
(&) Social Standards — Wilma Durham. 

(c) Blue Ridge — Margaret Pope. 

(d) "Y" Room — Mary Creech Williams. 

I. Community Service — Edna Earle Hinton. 
(a) On Campus — Elizabeth Cullom, 

(5) Off Campus — Carolyn Merger. 

II. Young Women's Auxiliary. 
Mary Lee Caldwell — President. 
FoY Peele — Y ice-President. 
Margaret Duncan — Secretary-Treasurer. 

ADVISORY BOARD 

Miss Catherine Allen 
Miss Marguerite Higgs 
Miss Beatrice Teague 

IV'ORK OF THE DIFFERENT DEPARTMENTS 

MEMBERSHIP DEPARTMENT 

Ruth Couch — Chairman 

Tlie purpose of this department is to stimu- 
ate the girls' interest in association work 
,nd to enlist them as members of the Y. W. C. 
L. These girls have charge of the Information 
Bureau at the beginning of the fall term and 
vant to do everything possible to help the 
lew girls, to make them feel at home, and to 
nake them realize that their co-operation is 
leeded in our association. 
37 



FINANCE DEPARTMENT 

II 

Alethia Feglton — Ghfiirman 

This department has charge of the finance 
of the Y. W. C. A. and keeps a systematic a( 
count of all receipts and expenditures. 

The following budget was carried out durin 
1919-1920: 



INCOME 






75 Million Campaign $18,720.0^ 

Dues 286.00 

General Receipts 587.35 

Pledges 350.00 

"Y" Stores 202.49 



Total $20,145.84 

EXPENDITUEES 

75 Million Campaign $18,720.00 

"Y" Room 147.92 

Printing 34.70 

Annual 45. 9B 

South Atlantic Field 114.00 

Literature 16.50 

Conventions and Conferences 238.50 

Departmental 148.48 

African School 350.00 

General 174.83 

Home Missions 25.00 

Total $20,013.86 

38 



PUBLICITY DEPARTMENT 

Christine Judd — Chairman 

The Publicity Department is the Information 
Bureau of the campus. Its duty is to keep 
;he girls informed concerning all the vital 
Drobiems of the day, and to keep them in close 
■ouch with all the Y. W. C. A. work of our 
i^ssociation and others. The poster committee, 
oy the several new, attractive posters con- 
spicuously placed each week, helps greatly to 
interest the girls. 

Quite a few new magazines and good books 
bave been added to our "Y" library this year, 
and there a girl may pass a pleasant hour in 
(light reading or study. 

Our Association is linked up with others 
by the contribution of unique plans to the 
Association Monthly and to the Acorn by our 
Editor. 

Thus the Publicity Department is the chan- 
nel through which the literature and posters 
containing the news of all lands are brought 
to our students. 

RELIGIOUS WORK DEPARTMENT 

AxN Eliza Beewee- — ChairTnan 

The work of the Religious Department is 
carried on through four committees. These 
are the program committee, the music com- 
mittee, the Bible Study committee and the 
morning watch committee. 
39 



It is the work of the Program Committee- 
to arrange the programs for the regular meet- 
ings on Sunday night. Speakers are chosen 
from the student body, faculty, or from out- 
side sources. These programs are very inter- 
esting and helpful. A special missionary 
program is given on the first Sunday night 
of each month. 

The Music Committee has charge of the 
choir for each religious meeting. This com- 
mittee arranges for soloists and for special 
programs. 

The Bible Study Committee arranges for the 
Bible classes during the fall semester. This 
committee selects leaders and books for each 
class. 

The Morning Watch Committee appoints a 
leader for the weekly services. The leaders are 
usually chosen from the student body. 

SOCIAL DEPARTMENT 
WiLMA Durham — ChairTnan 

The Social Department arranges for all social 
functions of the Association, including the 
parties for the new girls in the fall in our 
"Y" room. Its work also includes the creating 
and developing of college standards of the 
highest type. 

The purpose of the Blue Ridge Commitee is 
to interest the girls in the conference held at 
Blue Ridge, which it does by means of programs 
and posters. 

40 



COMMUNITY SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

Edna Earle Hinton — Chairman 

The Community Service Department gives 
the student an opportunity for some definite 
service for the Master, and strives to incarnate 
the "Y. W." ideals of social fellowship on and 
off the campus. This committee also aims to 
work Y\^ith the girls so as to promote community 
intelligence concerning the needs of the world 
at large. In order to do our greatest work we 
must have the co-operation of every girl in 
college. 

YOUNG WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 

Maey Lee Caldwell — President 

It is the aim of the Young Woman's Auxiliary 
to bring the girls into a very sympathetic, in- 
tellectual relationship with missions. On the 
first Sunday night in each month it gives a mis- 
sionary program. In connection with this 
work, it helps with the mission study classes 
that are conducted by either faculty members 
or some student. 

THE CABINET POLICY 

Aim of the Association: 

(a) To unite the women of the institution in 
loyalty to Jesus Christ. 

(&) To lead them to accept Him as their per- 
sonal Savior. 

41 



(c) To build them up in the knowledge of 
Christ, especially through Bible study and 
Christian service, that their character and 
conduct may be consonant with their belief. 
It shall thus associate them vfith the students 
of the world for the advancement of the King- 
dom of God. 

(d) To seek to enlist their devotion to the 
Christian Church and to the religious work of 
the institution. 

Aim of the CaMnet: 

To carry out the purpose of the Association 
by endeavoring: 

1. To bring every girl into Association work. 

2. To raise the standard of the social life of 
the school by frequent simple gatherings and 
by seeking to break down every barrier between 
the girls — thus holding up the social teachings 
of Jesus Christ. 

3. To spend part of each day in real prayer 
and faithful Bible study. 

4. To bring each girl into a close fellowship 
with Jesus Christ by means of Bible classes. 

5. To meet every Sunday afternoon for coun- 
sel and definite prayer and every Thursday 
night at 9:00 for prayer and discussion of work. 

6. To deepen the spiritual life of each girl, 
individually, by prayerful, personal work, by 
daily morning prayer meetings, and by weekly 
devotional meetings on Sunday night in the 
chapel. 

42 



7. To arouse interest in missions by 

(a) Giving systematically to missions; 
(&) Mission-study classes; 
(c) A strong missionary meeting the first 
Sunday night in each month. 

8. To keep ourselves informed in regard to 
general Association work. 

9. To give written monthly reports to the 
Secretary, and to keep careful records of all 
work for the help of the new cabinet. 

10. To heartily co-operate individually and as 
I a cabinet with the Student Council in securing 
; and maintaining a high standard of young wo- 
j manhood in our school. 

I 11. To consider ourselves a personal workers' 
band, endeavoring, with God's help, to bring to 
Christ every girl who has not already con- 
fessed Him, and to pray with this definite 
purpose. 

WHY YOU SHOULD JOIN 

THE YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN 

ASSOCIATION 

To you who are entering college this fall for 
the first time, let us say a few words about 
why you should join the Y. W. C. A. 

In the first place you should begin your col- 
lege life by identifying yourself with the Chris- 
tian work of the school, for in this way you are 
brought under the best influences of the college 
course. 

43 



A girl's character is formed before her col- j ( 
lege course is ended. In the molding of your i 
character, do you wish to leave out Christ? 
Be sure, then, that you join the Y. W. C. A. 
at the beginning of your course, and thereby 
seize the opportunity for the development of 
your spiritual life. 

You need spirtual inspiration as well as in- 
tellectual inspiration. 

You are given a wonderful opportunity for 
serving Christ by winning for Him the lives of 
those who have never known Him. 

In joining the Y. W. C. A. you are becoming 
a part of a world-wide student movement, which 
has for its members the strongest and most 
earnest students all over the world. 

"HINTS TO THE WISE" 

Come early and avoid the rush. 

Look out for Meredith Y. W. C. A. badges at 
the station. 

Listen for the call of the night watchman, if 
you come on a night train. 

Register as soon as possible after you arrive. 

After you register, go to the adjoining room, 
over the door of which Information Bureau will 
be printed in large letters, for any information. 

Those wearing the Y. W. C. A. badges will 
gladly give you any assistance they can during 
the days of classification. 

Writing materials may be purchased at the 
Y. W. C. A. stores on the second floor of Fair- 
44 



cloth Hall and on the third floor of Main Build- 
ing. 

Ask the old girls anything, any time. They 
are always anxious to help you. 

Bring pillowcases, sheets, blankets, dresser 
and table covers with you. Your material for 
curtains had best be bought here, so you will 
have no trouble in fitting your windows. But 
this is not all. Every college girl wants an 
attractive room. So bring your sofa cushions, 
pictures, mottoes, and all those litle fixings 
which add so much to a room. Remember that 
you Y/ill be here for nine months, and you 
certainly will enjoy life more in a cheerful 
room. 

Somebody is more homesick than you are. 
Try to forget that you are lonely and do some- 
thing for that other girl. 

The three bulletin boards — the official bulle- 
tin board, near the library door, the Student 
Government bulletin board, next to the mail 
boxes, and the Y. W. C. A. bulletin board, at 
the entrance to Faircloth Hall, are very im- 
portant. Watch them. 

Remember to patronize the firms that adver- 
tise in our publications. "Turn about is fair 
play." 

The library is for quiet study. If you talk, it 
misses its purpose. 

At tv/ilight when you feel the "blues" coming 
on, make a rush for the Y. W. C. A. room — No. 
2, first floor, East Building. The "blues" can't 
exist there at any time — day or night. 
45 



CHURCHES 

There are Baptist, Methodist, Presbyterian 
Episcopal, Catholic, Christian, Lutheran 
Churches in Raleigh. Every student is allowed 
to attend the church for which she has a 
choice. The first two Sundays after school 
opens the students are allowed to visit different 
churches of their denomination. After that 
they must fully decide what Church they prefer 
to attend regularly. 



46 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

OFFICERS FOR 1920-1921 

LiLLiAx Fraxklix President 

rtlARY Ltxx Judd Vice-President 

Edxa Eaele Hixtox Secretary 

Sybil Smith Treasurer 

To the new girls we would say, start right 
by going in for athletics, good and strong, the 
lay you enter. Adjust your academic program 
to your athletic program, instead of vice versa! 
There's nothing like "pep" — whether for your 
class or for your Alma Mater — and nothing 
develops it like contests in haskethall, relay 
'aces, tennis, tournaments, track meets, etc. 

From the middle of October until Field Day 
in May, regular gymnasium exercises are re- 
quired of all students, except Seniors, for two 
days each week. 

BASKET-BALL 

Each class has a team and inter-class games 
are played for the championship. A loving 
cup is awarded the winning team. 



47 



Schedule 

Final — Seniors vs. Sophomores.., Nov. 16 

Pinal — ^Juniors vs. Freshmen l<Iov. 19 

Championship Game Islov. 29 

The five best players in the college receive 
monograms, and compose the 'varsity team. 

TENNIS 
In the tennis tournaments the teams of each 
class compete for the championship. The win- 
ning team receives monograms presented by 
the Association. 

ScTiedule 

Final — Seniors vs. Sophomores April 12 

Final — Juniors vs. Freshmen April 15 

Championship Game April 23 

FIELD DAY 

This is our big holiday. Every student who 
has taken gymnasium may compete in the 
exercises. There are two honors awarded for 
each of the two features rendered by the dif 
ferent classes. These are called first and second 
honors, which are blue and red ribbons bearing 
the name of class and feature. Other parts ol 
the Field Day program are the May Pole Drill 
races, and games. 

In the coming year, 1920-21, we are hoping 
that all the girls will go in for athletics harder 
than ever, especially because in the near future 
we are expecting to take up Intercollegiate 
Athletics, and there's where our Alm^a Pviatei 
must shine! So come determined to make youi 
class team, and then the 'varsity team. 
48 



THE LITERARY SOCIETIES 

Mereditli's two literary societies, the Astro- 
tekton and the Philaretian, work together in 
friendly rivalry throughout the year. Their 
purpose is to help the students to combine 
their academic training in a practical manner 
with their social life, and to promote a useful 
experience in outside cultural interests. 

These societies have separate halls, in v/hich 
they meet for an hour on every Saturday night 
to enjoy clever programs or more informal 
un. Inter-society debates on current questions 
have been planned for the coming year. In 
3rder to stimulate the spirit of loyalty and 
ievelop initiative among the students, both 
ocieties usually present plays every session. 
During this past year, however, the two so- 
cieties united in producing the operetta, Little 
Almond Eyes. With their many good times, 
these societies constitute one of the most enjoy- 
able features of college life at Meredith. 

OFFICERS OF THE ASTROTEKTON LITERARY 
SOCIETY 

Ruth Goldsmith .President 

Annabel Beidgee Vice-President 

Beth Caeroll Secretary 

Beateice Nye Treasurer 

OFFICERS OF THE PHILARETIAN LITERARY 
SOCIETY 

Moultrie Deake President 

Evelyn Beidgee Vice-Presid&nt 

Hilda Sheets Secretary 

Sybil Smith Treasurer 

49 



STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

The Acorn is the monthly magazine of the 
students, published by the Philaretian and 
Astrotekton Literary Societies. The object of 
the magazine is to encourage literary composi- 
tion among the students and give expression to 
it. It is a source of encouragement to students 
who are making their best efforts in the 
English Department, and a challenge to those 
who are not. In addition to the purely literary 
contributions, the social, religious, and athletic 
phases of our college life will also be repre- 
sented. The Acorn is associated with similar 
magazines by means of exchange. Every mem- 
ber of the Societies receives the magazine on 
the payment of the membership fee. It will 
also be mailed to any address, the proper ar- 
rangements having been made with the business 
manager. 

The following girls form The Acorn staff: 

Evelyn Bridger Editor-in-Chief 

Beatrice Nye Associate Editor 

Bertha Moore ) ^ • m^--^ 

[ Junior Editors 
Catherine Brown ) 

Ruth Freeman ) „ -u ^ -.-^ 

^ ^ \ Sophiomore Editors 

Fannie Paul ' 

Mary Lynne Judd Business Manager 

To BE Elected Assistant Business Manager 

The Oak Leaves, also published by the lit- 
erary societies, is the college annual. It repre- 
50 



nts every phase of college life, not being, 
£6 The Acorn, primarily of a literary nature. 
hile each organization of the students has its 
ace in the annual, the Senior Class justly 
:cupies the foremost place. 

The following girls form the Annual staff: 

[DIE Penton Editor-iii-CMef 

NNiE UzzLE Associate Editor 

NNiE Hall Baity ,. . .Business Manager 

DiTH Jenkins Assistant Business Manager 

LETHEA FELTON 

UTH Couch 

ABBE PEITCHETT 

HYLLis Mays 

ELLiAN Feanklin AH Editor 



I Junior Editors 
\ Sophomore Editors 



It is the hope of the student body to be 
ble to publish a weekly or a semi-monthly 
joUege paper this year. We need and want 

paper that embraces all phases of college 
ife and activities and that will keep all the 
tudents informed on matters of current in- 
erest. We invite the co-operation of the new 
;irls in helping us to realize our hope, which 
7ill mean so much to the students and to the 
ollege as a whole. 

BUDGET 

The second Monday in October will be pay- 
lay. All dues for all organizations must be 
)aid that day. They are as follows: 
51 



student Government $ 1.00 

Y. W. C. A 1.00 

Society 3.00 

Annual 5.00 

Athletic Association 50 

*Total $10.50 I 

*Society initiation fee for new girls $1.00. 

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB 

The purpose of the International Relationj 
Club, which was recently organized under th( 
International Relations Committee hy Dr. J. L 
de R. Hamilton, of the University of North Car 
olina, is the study of the problems of moderi 
international relations. Although it is par 
ticularly helpful to the students majoring ir 
History, and has as its advisor the Historj 
Professor, this club is not confined to the 
students in this department, but all who are 
actively interested in world problems of today 
and who meet the academic requirements are 
eligible for membership. The club elected as 
its temporary officers the following: 

Louise Fleming. President 

Inez Boyd , Secretary 

The permanent officers are to be elected soon 
after the opening of the fall term. 
52 



GLEE CLUB 

OFFICERS FOR 1919-1920 

Annabel Bridger President 

Grace Mooney Vice-President 

Mary Ida Butler , Secretary 

Margaret Pope Treasurer 

Eugenia Thomas Business Manager 

The Glee Club is composed of the best voices 
in the college, under the direction of Dr. 
Dingley Brown, Director of Music. Students 
from all classes are eligible to membership, 
but there are certain academic requirements 
that each girl must meet before she may 
become a member. 

Although the Glee Club is an innovation, 
having been organized in the fall of 1919, the 
tremendous success it has met with this year 
assures its future. Only one trip was made 
this year, but arrangements are now being 
made for an extensive tour during the coming 
year. 

DRAMATIC CLUB 

OFFICERS FOR 1920-1921 

Ruth Goldsmith President 

Mary Lee Caldwell Vice-President 

Eloise Turley Secretary 

Ann Eliza Brewer Treasurer 

The Dramatic Club is composed of girls se- 
lected from the student body because of their 
special talent for this training. No girl is 



eligible for membership until her sophomor^ 
year, and certain academic requirements are 
necessary for entrance. 

This branch of college activity was discon- 
tinued sevral years ago, but, feeling the need 
of an organization of this character, it has 
been renewed under the experienced direction 
of Miss Laura Eiberg. 



54 



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